Willis's Current Notes: A Series of Articles on Antiquities, Biography, Heraldry, History, Language, Literature, Natural History, Topography, &c. Selected from Original Letters and Documents Addressed During the Year ... to the Publisher

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G. Willis, 1858
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Page 66 - He received me very courteously; but, it must be confessed, that his apartment, and furniture, and morning dress, were sufficiently uncouth. His brown suit of clothes looked very rusty; he had on a little old shrivelled unpowdered wig, which was too small for his head; his shirt-neck and knees of his breeches were loose; his black worsted stockings ill drawn up ; and he had a pair of unbuckled shoes by way of slippers.
Page 66 - Johnson, who it seems, upon a little recollection, had taken it into his head that he ought to have done the honours of his literary residence to a foreign lady of quality, and eager to show himself a man of gallantry, was hurrying down the stair-case in violent agitation. He overtook us before we reached the Temple-gate, and brushing in between me and Madame de Boufflers, seized her hand, and conducted her to her coach.
Page 65 - Temple, till at last he appeared in his shirt, with his little black wig on the top of his head instead of a nightcap, and a poker in his hand, imagining probably that some ruffians were coming to attack him. When he discovered who they were, and was told their errand, he smiled, and .with great good humour agreed to their proposal: "What, is it you, you dogs? I'll have a frisk with you.
Page 15 - ... at the reflection : but let not this be read as something that relates only to another ; for a few years only can divide the eye that is now reading from the hand that has written.
Page 26 - Whereas, by the grace and blessing of God, the Kings and Queens of this Realm, by many ages past, have had the happiness, by their sacred Touch, and invocation of the name of God, to cure those who are afflicted with the disease called the King's Evil ; and his Majesty, in no less measure than any of his Royal Predecessors, having had good success therein ; and, in his most gracious and pious disposition, being as ready and willing...
Page 65 - One night when Beauclerk and Langton had supped at a tavern in London, and sat till about three in the morning, it came into their heads to go and knock up Johnson, and see if they could prevail on him to join them in a ramble. They rapped violently at the door of his chambers in the Temple, till at last he appeared in his shirt, with his little black wig on the top of his head, instead of a nightcap, and a poker in his hand, imagining, probably, that some ruffians were coming to attack him. When...
Page 53 - How fading are the joys we dote upon! Like apparitions seen and gone; But those which soonest take their flight, Are the most exquisite and strong; Like angels' visits, short and bright, Mortality's too weak to bear them long.
Page 61 - Marshall only privy to it, and the means of bringing them together, which is a very odd thing ; and by this means she is even with the King's love to Mrs. Davis.
Page 65 - They did not stay long, but walked down to the Thames, took a boat, and rowed to Billingsgate, Beauclerk and Johnson were so well pleased with their amusement that they resolved to persevere in dissipation for the rest of the day: but Langton deserted them, being engaged to breakfast with some young ladies. Johnson scolded him for "leaving his social friends to go and sit with a set of wretched un-idea'd girls.
Page 75 - Still born to improve us in every part, His pencil our faces, his manners our heart. To coxcombs averse, yet most civilly steering, When they judged without skill he was still hard of hearing : When they talked of their Raphaels, Correggios, and stuff, He shifted his trumpet and only took snuff.

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