Brave New World Revisited

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Harper Collins, Feb 16, 2000 - Fiction - 130 pages
7 Reviews

When the novel Brave New World first appeared in 1932, its shocking analysis of a scientific dictatorship seemed a projection into the remote future.

Here, in one of the most important and fascinating books of his career, Aldous Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with his prophetic fantasy. He scrutinizes threats to humanity, such as overpopulation, propaganda, and chemical persuasion, and explains why we have found it virtually impossible to avoid them. Brave New World Revisited is a trenchant plea that humankind should educate itself for freedom before it is too late.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - madepercy - LibraryThing

Huxley writes about the world in 1957, 25 years after his most famous novel, Brave New World. This is more or less an academic work where Huxley considers numerous scholars of the period (in ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bibleblaster - LibraryThing

While written long ago, much of this sounds amazingly contemporary. "Propaganda in favor of action dictated by the impulses that are below self-interest offers false, garbled or incomplete evidence ... Read full review

Contents

OverPopulation
1
Quantity Quality Morality
13
OverOrganization
17
Propaganda in a Democratic Society
29
Propaganda Under a Dictatorship
37
The Arts of Selling
47
Brainwashing
59
VUI Chemical Persuasion
69
Subconscious Persuasion
79
Hypnopaedia
89
Education for Freedom
101
What Can Be Done?
113
About Aldous Huxley
126
Brave New World Revisited 1958
129
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Aldous Huxley (1894–1963) is the author of the classic novels Brave New World, Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Perennial Philosophy and The Doors of Perception. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford, he died in Los Angeles, California.

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