Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices

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SAGE, Apr 8, 1997 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 400 pages
3 Reviews
This broad-ranging text offers a comprehensive outline of how visual images, language and discourse work as `systems of representation'.

Individual chapters explore: representation as a signifying practice in a rich diversity of social contexts and institutional sites; the use of photography in the construction of national identity and culture; other cultures in ethnographic museums; fantasies of the racialized `Other' in popular media, film and image; the construction of masculine identities in discourses of consumer culture and advertising; and the gendering of narratives in television soap operas.

 

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User Review  - kaprogrammet - LibraryThing

This text outlines how visual images, language and discourse work as "systems of representation". It analyzes questions of meaning, truth, knowledge and power in representation, and the relations between representation, pleasure and fantasy. (Libris) Read full review

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The book explains clearly the issue of semiotic representation by emphasizing that representation through language is central to produce meaning. I have used this idea to support my research that English First Additional language speakers struggle with understanding Physical Science because of language barriers. 

Contents

I
1
II
13
IV
15
V
30
VI
36
VII
41
VIII
52
IX
59
XXV
219
XXVI
233
XXVII
243
XXVIII
251
XXIX
263
XXX
270
XXXI
285
XXXIII
287

X
73
XI
74
XII
79
XIII
86
XIV
90
XV
141
XVI
143
XVII
149
XVIII
151
XIX
152
XX
166
XXI
178
XXII
193
XXIII
198
XXIV
217
XXXIV
290
XXXV
296
XXXVI
298
XXXVII
309
XXXVIII
317
XXXIX
321
XL
331
XLI
333
XLII
334
XLIII
339
XLIV
344
XLV
359
XLVI
373
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About the author (1997)

Stuart Hall was born and raised in Jamaica and arrived in Britain on a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford in 1950. In 1958, he left his PhD on Henry James to found the New Left Review, which did much to open a debate about immigration and the politics of identity. Along with Raymond Williams and Richard Hoggart he established the first Cultural Studies programme at a British university in Birmingham in 1964, bringing the study of popular culture into the understanding of political and social change.

After spending more than four decades as one of the UK’s leading public intellectuals, Hall retired from formal academic life in 1997 and since then has continued to devote himself to questions of representation, creativity and difference. He became the chair of two foundations, Iniva, the Institute of International Visual Arts, and Autograph ABP, which seeks to promote photographers from culturally diverse backgrounds, and championed the opening of Iniva’s new Rivington Place arts complex in east London in 2007.

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