Crossroads, Directions and A New Critical Race Theory

Front Cover
Francisco Valdes, Jerome Mccristal Culp, Angela Harris
Temple University Press, Aug 12, 2002 - Law - 414 pages
Its opponents call it part of "the lunatic fringe," a justification for "black separateness," "the most embarrassing trend in American publishing." "It" is Critical Race Theory.

But what is Critical Race Theory? How did it develop? Where does it stand now? Where should it go in the future? In this volume, thirty-one CRT scholars present their views on the ideas and methods of CRT, its role in academia and in the culture at large, and its past, present, and future.

Critical race theorists assert that both the procedures and the substance of American law are structured to maintain white privilege. The neutrality and objectivity of the law are not just unattainable ideals; they are harmful actions that obscure the law's role in protecting white supremacy. This notion—so obvious to some, so unthinkable to others—has stimulated and divided legal thinking in this country and, increasingly, abroad.

The essays in Crossroads, Directions, and a New Critical Race Theory—all original—address this notion in a variety of helpful and exciting ways. They use analysis, personal experience, historical narrative, and many other techniques to explain the importance of looking critically at how race permeates our national consciousness.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

V
7
VII
28
VIII
67
IX
81
X
83
XII
89
XIV
128
XV
149
XXIV
264
XXVI
278
XXVII
293
XXVIII
300
XXIX
327
XXX
335
XXXII
356
XXXIII
367

XVII
177
XVIII
189
XIX
211
XX
233
XXI
241
XXIII
248
XXXIV
369
XXXV
383
XXXVI
389
XXXVIII
401
XXXIX
403
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Francisco Valdes is Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law.

Jerome McCristal Culp is Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law.

Angela P. Harris is Professor of Law at the University of California at Berkeley.

Bibliographic information