Social and Physical Condition of Negroes in Cities: Report of an Investigation Under the Direction of Atlanta University and Proceedings of the Second Conference for the Study of Problems Concerning Negro City Life, Held at Atlanta University, May 25-26, 1897

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Atlanta University Press, 1897 - African Americans - 86 pages
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Page 24 - ... mortality. If we eliminate these diseases our excessive death rate will be a thing of the past While I do not depreciate sanitary regulations and a knowledge of hygienic laws, I am convinced that a sine qua non of a change for the better in the negro's physical condition is a higher social morality. . . . From the health reports of all our large southern cities we learn that a considerable amount of our infant mortality is due to inanition, infantile debility, and infantile marasmus. Now what...
Page 28 - Anglo-Saxon were exterminating the inferior races more rapidly and more surely than shot, and shell, and bayonet. I mentioned a number of races that have perished not because of destructive wars and pestilence, but because they were unable to live in the environment of a nineteenth century civilization ; races whose destruction was not due to a persecution that came to them from without, but to a lack of moral stamina within ; races that perished in spite of the humanitarian and philanthropic efforts...
Page 27 - According to Hoffman, over 25 per cent of the negro children born in Washington City are admittedly illegitimate. According to a writer quoted in Black America, ' in one county of Mississippi there were during twelve months 300 marriage licenses taken out in the county clerk's office for white people. According to the proportion of population there should have been in the same time 1,200 or more for negroes. There were actually taken out by colored people just three.
Page 34 - Negroes is chiefly due to neglect of home and family life, the chief cause of which is the extent to which the mothers are obliged to go out to work ; Fourth — That the failure of the men to entirely support their families with their earnings has a most serious effect upon the social, physical and economic progress of the race ; Fifth — That finally, it appears that the Negro must reform himself, and that he is not dependent upon charity or municipal regulations, but has the means in his own...
Page 10 - ... enumerating some of the relations the mortality bears to other orders of facts. There is a relation betwixt death and sickness; and to every death from every cause there is an average number of attacks of sickness, and a specific number of persons incapacitated for work. Death is the extinction of pain. There is a relation betwixt death, health, and energy of body and mind. There is a relation betwixt death, birth, and marriage. There is a relation betwixt death and national primacy: numbers...
Page 25 - Health, who is also proprietorof a drug store, tells me that he is astonished at the number of colored women who apply at his store for drugs with a criminal purpose in view.
Page 44 - To go into the homes of the people and ... to sit with them, costs more than to make an address or contribute a quarter. And yet that is to my mind the only solution of this great sociological problem. We must come into close personal touch with the masses. To this some will put in objections. Will not these people presume upon our social reserve? Will not the upper class be dragged down by contact with the lower?
Page 9 - ... by colored people does not exist to any great extent, and is less than was supposed. In comparison with white women, an excess of colored women support their families, or contribute to the family support, by occupation which takes them much of their time from home, to the neglect of their children. Environment and the sanitary condition of houses are not chiefly responsible for the excessive mortality among colored people. "Ignorance and disregard of the laws of health are responsible for a large...
Page 58 - Our neighborhoods are filled with families which need the sympathy and cheer that a friendly visit from you would give, but you withhold yourself because they are a little lower in the social scale than you are, or if they are higher, you fear that they will think you are seeking their recognition. How much better off we would be if we would cease to draw these lines of caste and each of us as we climb the ladder reach down and assist a struggling sister!
Page 28 - I mentioned a number of races that have perished, not because of destructive wars and pestilence, but because they were unable to live in the environment of a. nineteenth, century civilization; races whose destruction was not due to a persecution w"hich came to them from without, but to a lack of moral stamina within; races 'that perished in spite of the humanitarian and philanthropic efforts that were put forth to save them.

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