Secret Memoirs of Princess Lamballe: Being Her Journals, Letters and Conversations During Her Confidential Relations with Marie Antoinette...

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Page 21 - Dauphiness had been entirely undressed, in order that she might retain nothing belonging to a foreign court (an etiquette always observed on such an occasion), the doors were opened ; the young Princess came forward...
Page 289 - ... serve him. I however quite agree with you in blaming the emigration of the nobles, and it was not long before the court found the ill consequences of it. Pressing letters were sent to invite many of them to come back, to some of which the queen added with her own hand the following postscript : " If you love your king, your religion, your government, and your country, return ! return ! return ! Marie Antoinette.
Page 225 - Wagons, full of corn and flour, which had been brought into Versailles, . formed a train escorted by grenadiers, and surrounded by women and bullies, some armed with pikes, and some carrying long branches of poplar. At some distance this part of the procession had a most singular effect: it looked like a moving forest, amidst which shone pike-heads and gun-barrels. In the paroxysms of their brutal joy, the women stopped passengers, and, pointing to the King's carriage, howled in their ears: "Cheer...
Page 225 - ... Versailles, formed a train escorted by grenadiers and surrounded by women and bullies, some armed with pikes and some carrying long branches of poplar. At some distance this part of the procession had a most singular effect : it looked like a moving forest, amidst which shone pike-heads and gun-barrels. In the paroxysms of their brutal joy the women stopped passengers, and, pointing to the King's carriage, howled in their ears : ' Cheer up, friends ; we shall no longer be in want of bread : we...
Page 11 - Antoinette, is suthciently known. The same spirit of ambition and enterprise, which had already animated her contentions with France, in the latter part of her career impelled her to wish for its alliance. In addition to other hopes, she had been encouraged to imagine, that Louis XV. might one day aid her in recovering the provinces which the king of Prussia had violently wrested from her ancient dominions. She felt the many advantages to be derived from an union with her ancient enemy, and she looked...
Page 326 - Lamballe approached me. I took her hand ; I bathed it with my tears, as she, at the same moment, was bathing my face with hers. Sobbing all the while, I replied that I was a stranger to fear, except that of incurring their displeasure; that, though to quit Paris and their august personages would be a severe sacrifice at a period so critical, yet it must greatly diminish my reluctance to know that I had the honour to be considered as useful elsewhere. I sincerely hoped they had not been influenced...
Page 340 - ... of freedom, would rush out of their cells, and fall on the knives of the assassins, who would stand ready to attack them. A friend of madame de Lamballe, in the belief that this most treacherous plan would be adopted, contrived to have a billet conveyed to her couched in these words : " Let whatever happen, for God's sake do not quit your cell: you will be spared.
Page 225 - Behind his Majesty's carriage were several of his faithful guards, some on foot, and some on horseback, most of them uncovered, all unarmed, and worn out with hunger and fatigue ; the dragoons, the Flanders regiment, the hundred Swiss, and the national guards, preceded, accompanied, or followed the file of carriages. I witnessed this heartrending spectacle ; I saw the ominous procession. In the midst of all the tumult, clamour, and...
Page 149 - ... which, though afterwards intended by Louis XV. for his mistress, Du Barry, never came to her in consequence of his death — this fatal necklace was still in existence, and in the possession of the crown jewellers, Boehmer and Bassange. It was valued at eighteen hundred thousand livres. The jewellers had often pressed it upon the queen, and even the king himself had enforced its acceptance. But the queen dreaded the expense, especially at an epoch of pecuniary...
Page 348 - Grief on the green sod knows no deception. How often have I left the sons of mirth and gayety paying libations to Bacchus to pass an hour at the grave of Maria Antoinette, lamenting I could not enjoy the same consolation, and unburden the anguish of my soul in solemn prayer, over her martyred friend. But she is above the reach of mortals. She is in Heaven; she dwells where virtues like those of a Lamballe can alone find refuge against earthly venom. I well know I shall be harshly dealt with for my...

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