The Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans., 1852 - Landscape gardening - 204 pages
 

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Page 123 - Knight and you are in the hahit of admiring fine pictures, and both live amidst bold and picturesque scenery : this may have rendered you insensible) to the beauty of those milder scenes that have charms for common observers. I will not arraign your taste, or call it vitiated, but your palate certainly requires a degree of "irritation...
Page 123 - ... beauty : with this view, gravel walks and neat mown lawns, and in some situations, straight alleys, fountains, terraces, and for aught I know, parterres and cut hedges are in perfect good taste, and infinitely more conformable to the principles which form the basis of our pleasure in these instances, than the docks, and thistles, and litter and disorder, that may make a much better figure in a picture.
Page 123 - Where docks, bullrushes, waterflags, and mallows Choke the rank waste, alike can yield delight. A blade of silver hair-grass nodding slowly In the soft wind ;• — the thistle's purple crown, The ferns, the rushes tall, and mosses lowly, A thorn, a weed, an insect, or a stone, Can thrill me with sensations exquisite — For all are exquisite, and every part Points to the mighty hand that fashion'd it.
Page 122 - Yet still preserve the lovely parent's face. How well the Bard obeys, each valley tells ; These lucid streams, gay meads, and lonely cells ; Where modest Art in silence lurks conceal'd, While Nature shines so gracefully reveal'd, That she triumphant claims the total plan, And, with fresh pride, adopts the work of man.
Page 122 - I shall conclude this long letter, by an allusion to a work, which it is impossible for you to admire more than I do. — Mr. Burke, in his Essay on the Sublime and Beautiful, observes, that habit will make a man prefer the taste of tobacco to that of sugar ; yet the world will never be brought to say that sugar is not sweet.
Page 123 - Nature in every form is lovely still. I can admire to ecstasy although I be not bower'd in a rustling grove, Tracing through flowery tufts some twinkling rill, Or perch'd upon a green and sunny hill, Gazing upon the sylvanry below, And harking to the warbling beaks above.
Page 47 - O let my years thus devious glide, Through silent scenes obscurely calm, Nor wealth nor strife pollute the tide...
Page 79 - LIFE i|OME, track with me this little vagrant rill, Wandering its wild course from the mountain's breast ; Now with a brink fantastic, heather-drest, And playing with the stooping flowers at will ; Now moving scarce, with noiseless step and still ; Anon it seems to weary of its rest, And hurries on, leaping with sparkling zest Adown the ledges of the broken hill.
Page 52 - Tis VEGETATION ! Gradual to his groves She gives their wished effects, and that displayed, O ! that her power would pause ; but, active still, She swells each stem, prolongs each vagrant bough, And darts, with unremitting vigour bold, From grace to wild luxuriance.
Page 123 - To me the wilderness of thorns and brambles Beneath whose weeds the muddy runnel scrambles — The bald, burnt moor — the marsh's sedgy shallows, Where docks, bullrushes, waterflags, and mallows Choke the rank waste, alike can yield delight. A blade of silver hair-grass nodding slowly In the soft wind ;• — the thistle's purple crown, The ferns, the rushes tall, and mosses lowly, A thorn, a weed, an insect, or a stone, Can...

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