In Search of Agamemnon: Early Travellers to Mycenae

Front Cover
Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Mar 17, 2014 - Literary Collections - 191 pages
0 Reviews
Although many books focus on the fascinating story of Heinrich Schliemann, little has been written on Mycenae before his excavations. This book, therefore, fills this gap. It looks at the English-speaking pioneers who visited the citadel at Mycenae before Schliemann, providing additional biographic references in the footnotes (and bibliography and associated sources). The book’s primary purpose is to bring back to life the thoughts of these pioneers on Mycenae. It is also a reflection on dating theories of the site during the nineteenth century. At that time, the general consensus concerning the beginning of the ‘Greek world’ was the classical civilisation of the fifth century BC. This was not the view of many of these travellers.

The ancients too had a fascination with Mycenae. The Homeric tales of Agamemnon, King of Mycenae, led to popular sixth and fifth century BC plays from the likes of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. But what did these ancient writers and later travellers, such as Pausanias, actually see?

Finally, there is a need to be reminded of some of the ‘pioneer’ travellers to Mycenae and their descriptions of the Lion Gate citadel and the ‘Treasury of Atreus’, as they are of particular historical interest. Not only that, but some of these observations are pure poetry and a delight to read.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
CHAPTER ONE
9
CHAPTER TWO
37
CHAPTER THREE
45
CHAPTER FOUR
77
CHAPTER FIVE
103
CHAPTER SIX
137
CONCLUSION
151
APPENDIX
155
BIBLIOGRAPHY
159
INDEX OF TRAVELLERS
175
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2014)

Dudley Moore lives in West Sussex in England. He is a barrister and a Lecturer in both Law and Aegean Archaeology. He studied Law as an undergraduate at the University of Sussex and Aegean Archaeology as a postgraduate at Brasenose College at the University of Oxford. He returned to Sussex University for his DPhil in Archaeology. He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London.

Edward Rowlands lives in New York. He studied Ancient History and Archaeology at the University of Liverpool, and thereafter Aegean Archaeology as a postgraduate at Keble College at the University of Oxford.

Nektarios Karadimas lives in Athens and is a co-founder and the legal representative of Aegeus, Society for Aegean Prehistory. He studied Archaeology at the University of Ioannina, Greece, and received his DEA at the University of Paris I, and thereafter his PhD at the University of Bristol.

Bibliographic information