What I Saw in America

Front Cover
Dodd, Mead, 1922 - United States - 297 pages
 

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Published in 1922, Chesterton records his observations from a lecture tour of America in 1921. The book is all Chesterton, so it contains philosophy, politics, humor, and wisdom all mixed in a free ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
19
III
33
IV
47
V
63
VI
79
VII
95
VIII
118
XI
176
XII
188
XIII
201
XIV
214
XV
226
XVI
243
XVII
257
XVIII
270

IX
141
X
158

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Page 198 - by America for the large and sober religion of the eighteenth century; it is where an old house in Philadelphia contains an old picture of Franklin, or where the men of Maryland raised above their city the first monument of Washington. It is there that I feel like one who treads alone some banquet hall deserted, whose lights are fled, whose garlands dead, and all save he
Page 150 - among the other Blue Laws for a land of blue devils. He should gag all gay deceivers and plausible cynics; he should cut off all flattering lips and the tongue that speaketh proud things. Nobody can doubt that nine-tenths of the harm in the world is done simply by talking. Jefferson and the old democrats allowed people to talk, not because they were unaware of this fact, but because they
Page 297 - linger as they like over carrion, and for them as for the plutocrats existence may have no origin and no end; but it was far back in the land of legends, where instincts find their true images, that the cry went forth that freedom is an eagle, whose glory is gazing at the sun. THE
Page 16 - is the pure classic conception that no man must aspire to be anything more than a citizen, and that no man should endure to be anything less. It is by no means
Page 74 - Here is to jolly old Boston, the home of the bean and the cod, Where Cabots speak only to Lowells, and Lowells speak only to God.
Page 9 - by Turks, as she is invaded by Jews or Bulgars. In the most exquisitely inconsequent of the Bab Ballads, we are told concerning Pasha Bailey Ben:— One morning knocked at half-past eight A tall Red Indian at his gate. In Turkey, as
Page 199 - O hidden face of man, whereover The years have woven a viewless veil, If thou wert verily man's lover
Page 166 - wordless wave, that I should like to see a sulky woman. |How she would walk in beauty like the night, and reveal
Page 8 - diverse races which has been compared to a melting-pot] ^But even that metaphor implies that the pot itself is of a certain shape and a certain substance; a pretty solid substance. The melting-pot must not melt. The original shape was traced on the lines of Jeffersonian democracy; and it will remain
Page 243 - one, is to suggest this thesis; that the very worst way of helping Anglo-American friendship is to be an AngloAmerican. There is only one thing lower, of course, which is being

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