History of English Literature from Beowulf to Swinburne

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Wildside Press LLC, Jan 1, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 708 pages
Andrew Lang's survey of English literature is a remarkably thorough look at the history of English writing, covering authors from Abbot Adamnan to Edward Young, and everyone of note in between.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
Latin among
23
Latin LiteratureWalter
35
The Stories of Arthur
42
OrnxulumAncren RiwleThe
48
TristramHavelokKing Horn
60
Gawain and the Green
72
Early PoemsThe Dethe of the DuchesseOther
78
Minor Lyrists
283
MiltonJeremy TaylorThomas Fuller
303
CrashawHerbertVaughanHerrick
328
CongreveVanbrughGeorge Far
358
Alexander PopePriorGayAmbrose
382
SteeleAddisonSwiftDe Foe
394
Edward YoungJames Thomson
422
Thomas ChattertonWilliam Cowper
434

Piers Plowman Gower
99
LydgateOccleve Hawes
110
Malory
124
Popular Poetry Ballads
147
HeywoodRalph Roister Doister
153
The Earl
163
Beaumont and FletcherChapman
242
Hooker
265
The Great Novelists Richardson
458
Samuel JohnsonOliver Goldsmith
471
ColeridgeWalter Scott
497
Charles LambLeigh Hunt
530
Philip FreneauWilliam Cullen
581
Dickens
609
Thomas Babington MacaulayThomas Carlyle
643
Index
667

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About the author (2003)

Andrew Lang was born at Selkirk in Scotland on March 31, 1844. He was a historian, poet, novelist, journalist, translator, and anthropologist, in connection with his work on literary texts. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy, St. Andrews University, and Balliol College, Oxford University, becoming a fellow at Merton College. His poetry includes Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872), Ballades in Blue China (1880--81), and Grass of Parnassus (1888--92). His anthropology and his defense of the value of folklore as the basis of religion is expressed in his works Custom and Myth (1884), Myth, Ritual and Religion (1887), and The Making of Religion (1898). He also translated Homer and critiqued James G. Frazer's views of mythology as expressed in The Golden Bough. He was considered a good historian, with a readable narrative style and knowledge of the original sources including his works A History of Scotland (1900-7), James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902), and Sir George Mackenzie (1909). He was one of the most important collectors of folk and fairy tales. His collections of Fairy books, including The Blue Fairy Book, preserved and handed down many of the better-known folk tales from the time. He died of angina pectoris on July 20, 1912.

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