Greek Architecture and Its Sculpture

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 2006 - Architecture - 271 pages
0 Reviews

From Athens and Arcadia on one side of the Aegean Sea and from Ionia, Lycia, and Karia on the other, this book brings together some of the great monuments of classical antiquity --among them two of the seven wonders of the ancient world, the later temple of Artemis at Ephesos and the Mausoleum at Halikarnassos.

Drawing on the Greek and Lycian architecture and sculpture in the British Museum--a collection second to none in quality, quantity, and geographical and chronological range--this lavishly illustrated volume tells a remarkable story reaching from the archaic temple of Artemis, the Parthenon, and other temples of the Athenian Acropolis to the temple of Apollo at Bassai, the sculptured tombs of Lycia, the Mausoleum, and the temple of Athena Polias at Priene. Ian Jenkins explains each as a work of art and as a historical phenomenon, revealing how the complex personality of these buildings is bound up with the people who funded, designed, built, used, destroyed, discovered, and studied them. With 250 photographs and specially commissioned line drawings, the book comprises a monumental narrative of the art and architecture that gave form, direction, and meaning to much of Western culture.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Preface
7
Introduction
9
Map
13
Enlightenment and Renaissance
14
Greek Temples Form and Meaning
26
The Temples of Artemis at Ephesos
47
The Parthenon and Its Sculptures
71
The Athenian Acropolis Propylaea Nike Temple and Erechtheum
108
Lycian Tombs
151
The Nereid Monument
186
The Mausoleum at Halikarnassos
203
The Temple of Athena Polias at Priene
236
Notes
250
Bibliography
258
Index
266
Illustration Acknowledgements
270

The Temple of Apollo Epikourios at Bassai
130

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Ian Jenkins is Senior Curator in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities in the British Museum, where he has responsibility for the Greek collections. His many publications include Archaeologists and Aesthetes and The Parthenon Frieze.

Kate Morton was born in South Australia in 1976. She earned a degree in speech and drama from Trinity College London, an English literature degree from the University of Queensland, and a master's degree focusing on tragedy in Victorian literature from the University of Queensland. She also completed a summer Shakespeare course at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London. She is currently enrolled in a Ph.D. program researching contemporary novels that marry elements of gothic and mystery fiction. She won the Australian Book Industry Award for General Fiction Book of the Year in 2007 for her debut novel, The Shifting Fog, also known as The House at Riverton. Her other books include The Distant Hours, and The Forgotten Garden, which won the Australian Book Industry Award for General Fiction Book of the Year in 2009. Her books The Secret Keeper and The Lake House were New York Times bestsellers.

Bibliographic information