The child's first book of geography

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Bell and Daldy, 1872 - Geography - 300 pages
 

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Page 166 - ... large number of old castles, which are supposed to have been built to protect the inhabitants from the Welsh in time of war. Shropshire, or Salop, also borders on Wales. The river Severn flows through it, and is navigable ; that is, it is large enough to be sailed on by barges, which are towed by men walking on the banks. Some parts of the county are hilly, others more level, but nearly all are richly cultivated. The most remarkable hill is the Wrekin, which is shaped somewhat like a sugar-loaf....
Page 208 - At last King Edward I. conquered them, and slew their prince; and that they might now have for their prince some one born in their own land, he offered them his eldest son, who was just born at the Castle of Carnarvon ; and the Welsh, rather than have to fight any more battles, chose him for their prince. Ever since that time, the eldest son of the King or Queen of England has always had the title of Prince of Wales ; though it is only since the reign of Henry VIII.
Page 8 - ... ground or surface of the earth is not everywhere the same. A piece of ground which is shut in all round, and has plants growing in it, is called a garden, or field. If the field has grass growing in it, it is called a meadow; if cows and sheep feed in it, it is called a pasture; but if the grass is to be made into hay, it is called a hay-field; and fields in which corn or turnips are grown, are called corn-fields, or turnip-fields. The hedges or railings which go round a field are called its...
Page 155 - Suffolk is a level county, with few rivers, but tolerably well wooded. It was anciently famous for its woollen cloth made by Flemish weavers, who were invited over to teach the English their art ; but there are now only a few manufactories of stuff and silk. Hemp is grown in almost all the cottage gardens, and spun into a kind of coarse linen. Norfolk is a flat county, very little wooded, but richly cultivated, and remarkable for the neatness of its farmhouses and cottages. It is famous for its poultry,...
Page 40 - A village built by the sea-side, in which fishermen live, is called a fishingvillage. In a country village the men mostly work in the fields, and the women stay at home to mind the houses and take care of the children ; in busy times, such as sowing time and harvest, they help their husbands in the fields. The men of a...
Page 262 - ... to Scotland and England. The cliffs are frequented in summer by countless numbers of sea-birds, which build their nests in the sides of the steepest rocks. Many of the Shetlanders gain their living by collecting the eggs, feathers, and young of these birds. They allow themselves to be let down from the edge of the cliff with a rope tied round their bodies, and when they have gathered all that they can reach, they are pulled up again with their prize. Foula, the most westerly of these islands,...
Page 130 - Martin-inthe-fields has no fields within half an hour's walk of it. Many other places which are now joined to London and Westminster were once quite in the country; and the Londoners used to go to them on holidays to enjoy the fresh air and a stroll in the meadows. The first of these, to which coaches ran at certain times, was Hackney; and so all such coaches came to be called hackney-coaches. London and Westminster now form one great town, so that you cannot see where one ends and the other begins.
Page 284 - Dublin is that of tabinet, or poplin, a rich stuff made of silk and woollen, which is used for making ladies' dresses. Near Navan, in the county of East Meath, is the hill of Tara, where once stood a palace of the Irish kings, and where the people, in times of danger, held great meetings. Nothing now remains of this once famous place but a few stones and grassy mounds. In the county of Louth is Drogheda, not far from which was fought the famous battle of the Boyne, between the armies of James II.
Page 238 - Highlanders and Lowlanders joined together, and led an army into England; and such doings as these were made excuses for many bloody wars between England and Scotland. When you come to read the histories of these two countries, you will find a great part of them taken up with the accounts of such battles. Scotland then had a king of its own; not a king like her Majesty Queen Victoria, whom...
Page 117 - England, and may be seen at a great distance. Berkshire is said to have taken its name from the number of birch-trees which once grew in it. The most famous place in this county is Windsor, where is an ancient and noble castle, in which many of the kings and queens of England have lived. St. George's Chapel is close to the castle, and contains the tombs of many of them.

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