Cane

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1975 - Fiction - 116 pages
12 Reviews
A literary masterpiece of the Harlem Renaissance, Cane is a powerful work of innovative fiction evoking black life in the South. The sketches, poems, and stories of black rural and urban life that make up Cane are rich in imagery. Visions of smoke, sugarcane, dusk, and flame permeate the Southern landscape: the Northern world is pictured as a harsher reality of asphalt streets. Impressionistic, sometimes surrealistic, the pieces are redolent of nature and Africa, with sensuous appeals to eye and ear.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Dreesie - LibraryThing

It took me 10 days to read this short book. It includes poems, short vignettes about (fictional?) women (which annoyed me, because why?), and then 2 short stories. There does not seem to be a common ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mojomomma - LibraryThing

A collection of short stories about black life in the early 20th century, written by a man who sometimes passed as white during his life! The information at the end of the book about how Toomer dealt with race was quite interesting. Read full review

Contents

Reapers
3
Nullo
18
Seventh Street
39
Her Lips Are Copper Wire
54
Prayer
68
Kabnis
81
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About the author (1975)

Jean Toomer (1894–1967)†was born in Washington, D.C., the son of educated blacks of Creole stock. Literature was his first love and he regularly contributed avant garde poetry and short stories to such magazines as Dial, Broom, Secession, Double Dealer, and Little Review. After a literary apprenticeship in New York, Toomer taught school in rural Georgia. His experiences there led to the writing of Cane.

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