A Critical Grammar of the Hebrew Language, Volume 1

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Wiley and Putnam, 1842 - Hebrew language
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OCLC: 10494364
Related Subjects: Hebrew language -- Grammar.
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Page vi - ... and such doubtless it will continue, so long as we shall remain ignorant of the nature of the union existing between the body and the soul. For the present therefore we must rest content with the ability to trace the connection of such of these representatives of ideas with their originals, as are rather imitations of material sounds than the immediate production of the operations of the mind, viz.
Page 130 - ... the children also of Judah and the children of Jerusalem have ye sold unto the Grecians, that ye might remove them far from their border. Behold, I will raise them out of the place whither ye have sold them, and will return your recompence upon your own head...
Page iv - The revolution thus produced within the last thirty years in the science of philology, is one which for magnitude and rapidity has not been surpassed in the history of the human mind. When the scholars of Europe directed their intellectual vision to that newly discovered star in the East, the Sanscrit, now so brightly illumining the horizon of philology, — and led on by its refulgent beams arrived at the classic soil of the ancient Hindu, where to their astonishment they recognized the scenery...
Page vi - Since, however, the external sound belongs entirely to the material, and the idea which it represents as exclusively to the immaterial world, the two stand at a distance so remote from each other, that the connection between them has hitherto been a complete res occulta ; and such doubtless it will continue, so long as we shall remain ignorant of the nature of the union existing between the body and the soul. For the present, therefore, we must rest content with the ability to trace the connection...
Page vi - ... continue, so long as we shall remain ignorant of the nature of the union existing between the body and the soul. For the present therefore we must rest content with the ability to trace the connection of such of these representatives of ideas with their originals, as are rather imitations of material sounds than the immediate production of the operations of the mind, viz. onomatopees ; while that which exists between those words and their primary cause, whose origin lies in the activity of the...
Page x - ... is not unfrequently preserved in another of the same stock. " A plan similar to the above must be pursued in the attempt to deduce the primitive meaning of a word from the variety of acceptations in which it may be employed ; that is, our researches must be uniformly directed to the discovery of that idea which forms the foundation of all the rest. And this will always be that which lies nearest the soul of man, and is most likely first to affect it; for the first activity of the organs is exerted...
Page 51 - DB>), was forbidden to be uttered by any except the high priest, and by him but once a year in the Holy of Holies. On all other occasions it was to be read...
Page 105 - ... by suffixing li; as, achukmali, to make good; Ivshpali, to make hot, to heat. Of these suffixes, chi denotes the causing of the action signified by the primitive verb; as, kvllochi, to harden, from kvllo, to be hard; kolichi, to cause to break, from koli, to break; chechi suffixed to a verb denotes the causing by its own subject of the performance of the action signified by the verb by another subject on an object expressed or understood; as, vno vt vlla yj ikhish a.
Page ix - The mutations produced by this mode of designating related ideas may be denominated EXTERNAL. They are far more decided and important than those of the preceding kind ; for as the word becomes increased, its objectivity is enlarged, and the greater are the changes it admits. As a result of this variety in the modes of constructing expressions for ideas similar to those already denoted by words, we find that not only is derivation...

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