Frontiers of Family Economics

Front Cover
Emerald Group Publishing, Jun 23, 2008 - Business & Economics - 208 pages
Over the past several decades there have been substantial changes in the size, composition, educational level, work activity, and locational choice of families. The aim of this book series is to provide a better understanding of the forces that have led to the choices and consequent observed changes. The aforementioned changes have likely resulted from varied sources. The initial book will provide a collection of articles at the frontier of research on issues relevant to family decision making and the outcomes of such decisions. The book will contain theoretical as well as empirical insights. Future volumes will focus more narrowly on particular topics. The term family economics is, admittedly, quite broad; however, it was chosen precisely for that feature. The topics to be covered are vast, yet likely interrelated: What explains the rise in labor force participation of women over the past fifty years? What role does technological advance in the household sector play in understanding the behavior of labor force participation and hours of work at home and in the market? What explains the increase in occupational mobility over the past several decades? What factors might be important in explaining the increased rate of divorce? What effect does the increased divorce rate have on the outcomes of children? How much does schooling choice matter for child outcomes? What are the factors that lead to migration/immigration? What explains the explosion in personal bankruptcy rates observed over the past two decades? These are examples of questions that are currently being asked by researchers throughout the world. Moreover, the answers to such questions can help guide policy makers in understanding how their decisions affect the choices made by individuals and families. The book series will provide readers with a solid theoretical framework as well as a thorough description of the relevant data.
 

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Contents

ORIGINS AND CONSEQUENCES OF CHILDLABOR RESTRICTIONS A MACROECONOMIC PERSPECTIVE
1
A benchmark model
3
22 Firms
4
24 Characterization of the laissezfaire equilibrium
6
25 Introducing childlabor legislation
8
26 The longrun consequences of childlabor legislation
9
27 Transition path
12
28 Distributional consequences of childlabor laws
13
Model
141
Bellman equations
143
32 Firms
145
Calibration
150
51 Womens liberation and crime
152
52 Changes in productivity
156
Conclusion
158
Home sector
159

29 Extensions
14
Potential rationales for government intervention
15
32 Borrowing constraints
18
33 Imperfect altruism
20
34 Imperfect insurance markets
21
42 A simplified model
23
43 Political preferences of skilled and unskilled workers
26
44 Dependency on child labor and political support for a ban
28
45 Repeated voting and policy persistence
30
46 Discussion
32
Conclusions
33
Optimal education allocation with a childlabor ban
35
References
36
FILLING THE POVERTY GAP THEN AND NOW
39
Introduction
40
Background on income maintenance programs and taxes
42
Measuring the poverty gap
45
Filling the poverty gap 19792001
48
42 Regional variation in poverty gaps
53
43 Variation in poverty gaps by race
59
44 Variation in poverty gaps by family structure
68
45 Variation in poverty gaps by presence of children
80
Conclusion
88
Appendix A
89
References
113
CHANGES IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF FAMILY HOURS WORKED SINCE 1950
115
Data
117
Aggregate patterns 19502005
118
Disaggregated patterns Household hours by skill level
123
42 Skill based on husbands educational attainment
126
43 Skill based on couples educational attainment
129
Time use of households
131
Conclusion
134
Appendix A
135
References
137
THE LABOR MARKET AND FEMALE CRIME
139
Appendix B
160
References
162
AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF FERTILITY IN THE UNITED STATES 18261960
165
Introduction
166
Previous work on fertility and income
170
Basic trends in US fertility
175
Economic determinants of fertility in the US census data
183
41 Occupational income and fertility
184
42 Education and fertility
196
Other cuts on the data on fertility
201
51 Overall CEB vs occupational income for subgroups
202
52 Compression
204
Conclusions
207
Methodology
209
Additional data
211
Robustness
217
Definitions of fertility measures
219
Additional figures
220
References
225
FAMILIES AND CAREERS
231
Occupational mobility
235
22 Findings
238
23 Occupational mobility and the distribution of employment across broad occupational groups
243
Geographic mobility
244
Findings
246
33 Oneyear state mobility
250
Joint geographic and occupational mobility
252
Net mobility
254
51 Net occupational mobility
255
53 Net mobility across occupationstate cells
256
Discussion
257
Threedigit occupation classification system
260
Twodigit occupation classification system
267
Onedigit occupation classification system
269
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