Ti-ping Tien-kwoh: The History of the Ti-ping Revolution, Volume 1

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Day & son (limited), 1866 - China - 842 pages
 

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Page 822 - We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed ; we are perplexed, but not in despair ; Persecuted, but not forsaken ; cast down, but not destroyed ; Always bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our body. For we which live are alway delivered unto death for Jesus' sake, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our mortal flesh.
Page 37 - All human beings in the whole world are produced and sustained by me; they eat my food and wear my clothing, but not a single one among them has a heart to remember and venerate me; what is however still worse than that, they take of my gifts, and therewith worship demons; they purposely rebel against me, and arouse my anger. Do thou not imitate them.
Page 824 - In the beginning the great God made heaven and earth, land and sea, men and things, in six days; and having finished his works on the seventh day, he called it the day of rest (or Sabbath): therefore all the men of the world, who enjoy the blessing of the great God, should on every seventh day especially reverence and worship the great God, and praise him for his goodness.
Page 164 - Shanghae, this afternoon, I proceeded to one of the chapels belonging to the London Missionary Society, where I commenced preaching to a large congregation, which had almost immediately gathered within the walls. I was descanting on the folly of idolatry, and urging the necessity of worshipping the one true God, on the ground that he alone could protect his servants, while idols were things of nought, destined soon to perish out of the land — when suddenly a man stood up in the midst of the congregation...
Page 37 - As he left the sedan, an old woman took him down to a river, and said, ' Thou dirty man, why hast thou kept company with yonder people and defiled thyself? I must now wash thee clean.
Page 42 - are certainly sent purposely by heaven to me, to confirm the truth of my former experiences ; if I had received the books, without having gone through the sickness, I should not have dared to believe in them, and on my own account to oppose the customs of the whole world ; if I had merely been sick, but...
Page 38 - ... put on his clothes, left his bedroom, went into the presence of his father, and making a low bow said, 'The venerable old man above has commanded that all men shall turn to me, and all treasures shall flow to me.
Page 94 - I, the General, in obedience to the royal commands, have put in motion the troops for the punishment of the oppressor, and in every place to which I have come, the enemy at the first report have dispersed like scattered rubbish. As soon as a city has been captured, I have put to death the rapacious mandarins and corrupt magistrates therein, but have not injured a single individual of the people, so that all of you may take care of your families and attend to your business without alarm and trepidation.
Page 38 - ... father felt very anxious about the state of his mind, and ascribed their present misfortune to the fault of the Geomancer in selecting an unlucky spot of ground for the burial of their forefathers. He invited therefore magicians, who by their secret art should drive away evil spirits; but Siu-tshuen said, "How could these imps dare to oppose me? I must slay them, I must slay them ! Many many cannot resist me.
Page 165 - ... of any kind ; all offences against the commandments of God are punished by him with the severest rigour, while the incorrigible are beheaded — therefore, repent in time.

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