The Significance of John Eliot's Natick and the Name Merrimac: With Historical and Ethnological Notes

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F.P. Harper, 1901 - Algonquian languages - 56 pages
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Page 8 - Beads into pretty Figures ; her Bracelets and her Necklace were of the same sort of Beads, and she had a little Tablet upon her Breast very finely deck'd with Jewels and Precious Stones ; her Hair was comb'd back and ty'd up with a Border, which was neatly work'd both with Gold and Silver...
Page 50 - Assignes, all that Parte of Newe England in America, which lyes and extendes betweene a great River there, comonlie called Monomack River, alias Merrimack River, and a certen other River there, called Charles River, being in the Bottome of a certen Bay there, comonlie called Massachusetts, alias Mattachusetts, alias Massatusetts Bay...
Page 35 - Learning, we are also a doing (according to the measure of our day of small things) in the civill part of this work, we have set out some part of the Town in several streets, measuring out and dividing of Lots, which I set them to doe, and teach them how to doe it : many have planted Apple-Trees, and they have begun divers Orchards...
Page 36 - Buildings &ic. and especially [p.2] in building without any English Workmans help, or direction a very sufficient Meeting-House, of fifty foot long twenty five foot broad, neer twelve foot high betwixt the joints, wel sawen and framed (which is a specimen, not only of their singular ingenuity, and dexterity, but also of some industry) I say this being so, now my argument of delaying them from entering into Church-Estate, was taken away.
Page 6 - Eliot's lectures, and recorded the incidents of his visit as here follows : " We had about twenty miles to Natick, where the best accommodations we could meet with, were very coarse. We ty'd up our horses in two old barns, that were almost laid in ruins. But there was no place where we could bestow ourselves, unless upon the green sward, till the lecture began. While we were making discoveries around the Indian village, we were informed that the sachem, or the Indian king and his queen were there.
Page 35 - Alcvnves come, there we built a Bridge, and made a wyre to catch Fish, and being many of them, some we appointed to one work, and some to another, through the blessing of God we brought both these works to perfection : we also have begun a Pallizadoe Fort, in the midst whereof we intend a meeting-house and a Schoole-house, but we are in great want of Tooles, and many necessaries, and when we cannot goe we must be content to creep : this present week I am going to Pawtucket, the great Fishing place...
Page 36 - ... fixed in an Habitation, and had some means of livelihood to lose, and leave behind him: such Reasons have satisfied them hitherunto. But now being come under Civil Order, and fixing themselves in Habitations, and bending themselves to labor, as doth appear by their works of Fencings, Buildings &c. and especially in building, without any English Workmans help, or direction, a very sufficient Meeting-House, of fifty foot long, twenty five foot broad, neer twelve foot high betwixt the...
Page 25 - Praying-Towns at the remotest Westerly borders of Natick; these are gathering together of some Nipmuk Indians who left their own places, and sit together in this place, and have given up themselves to pray unto God. They have called Pomham to be their Ruler, and Simon to be their Teacher. This latter is accounted a good and lively Christian; he is the second man among the Indians that doth experience that afflicting disease of the Stone. The Ruler hath made his Preparatory Confession of Christ, and...
Page 37 - ... Lord did by his speciall providence, and answer of prayers, pitch us upon the place where we are at Natick. Unto which place my purpose at first was to have brought all the Praying Indians to Cohabit together : But it so fell out (by the guidance of God, as it now appeareth) that because the Cohannet Indians desired a place which they had reserved for themselves, and I finding that I could not at that time pitch there without opposition from some English, I refused that place, and pitched at...
Page 26 - Magunkook (Nip'm), — a tract of land of about 300 acres, principally in Hopkinton, Mass., which was granted by Massachusetts to be occupied by the praying Indians. Gookin (1674) writes the name of the Indian town Magunkaquog, and says that the signification of the name is

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