The Parliamentary Or Constitutional History of England: Being a Faithful Account of All the Most Remarkable Transactions in Parliament, from the Earliest Times. Collected from the Journals of Both Houses, the Records, Original Manuscripts, Scarce Speeches, and Tracts; All Compared Withthe Several Contemporary Writers, and Connected, Throughout, with the History of the Times. By Several Hands...

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Printed; and sold by T. Osborne; and W. Sandby, 1751 - Great Britain
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Page 363 - I can live, although another who has no right be put to live with me; nay, I can live although I pay excises and impositions more than I do; but to have my liberty, which is the soul of my life, taken from me by power; and to...
Page 406 - That the writ of habeas corpus may not be denied, but ought to be granted to every man that is committed or detained in prison, or otherwise restrained, though it be by the command of the king, the privy council, or any other, he praying the same.
Page 368 - They have rent from us the light of our eyes ; enforced companies of guests worse than the ordinances of France ; vitiated our wives and daughters before our faces ; brought the crown to greater want than ever it was, by anticipating the revenue ; and can the shepherd be thus smitten and the flock not be scattered...
Page 411 - And whereas also by authority of Parliament, in the 25th year of the reign of King Edward the Third, it is declared and enacted, that no man shall be forejudged of life or limb against the form of the Great Charter, and the law of the land...
Page 406 - That the ancient and undoubted right of every freeman is, that he hath a full and absolute property in his goods and estate; and that no tax, tallage, loan, benevolence, or other like charge, ought to be commanded or levied by the king or his ministers, without common assent of Parliament.
Page 151 - The duke's plurality of offices reminded him " of a chimerical beast called by the ancients Stellionatus, so blurred, so spotted, so full of foul lines that they knew not what to make of it...
Page 260 - Majesty, nor was present when the same was first taken or applied ; but the truth is this, that His...
Page 369 - King may enhance what he pleaseth ? I know the King will not do it. I know he is a religious King, free from personal vices; but he deals with other men's hands, and sees with other men's eyes. Will any give a subsidy...
Page 158 - In thu.ie messages he told you, that if there were not correspondency between him and you, he should be enforced to use new counsels. Now, I pray you consider, what these new counsels arc, and may be.
Page 406 - That the Writ of Habeas Corpus cannot be denied, but ought to be granted to every Man, that is committed or detained in Prifon, or otherwife reftrained, by the Command of the King, the Privy-Council, or any other ; he praying the fame.

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