Sketches of China: partly during an inland journey of four months, between Peking, Nanking, and Canton; with notices and observations relative to the present war, Volume 1

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Page 210 - Are brought ; and feel by turns the bitter change Of fierce extremes, extremes by change more fierce, From beds of raging fire to starve in ice Their soft ethereal warmth, and there to pine Immovable, infix'd, and frozen round, Periods of time ; thence hurried back to fire.
Page 253 - Sungli who lived under the first- emperor of the Ming dynasty, at the end of the 14th century. In his time a part of the canal in Shantung province became so impassable, that the coasting passage by sea began to be most used. This was the very thing that the canal had been intended to prevent ; Sung...
Page 81 - the red declaration," locally called " The Grand Chop." It is an official passport from the Viceroy and Hoppo.* It states the captain's name, the tonnage and cargo of the vessel, and the compliance, on the part of the former, with the customary...
Page 4 - ... in certain directions, and in others so weak as habitually to give way for fear of being defeated ; the policy of the state an unexampled mixture of wisdom and folly — profound views and superficial errors — patronage of art and of science, combined with prohibition of foreign improvements — encouragement of domestic industry, with exclusion of external commerce — promotion of inland manufacture and trade, without employing the precious metals as a medium of exchange — * Brougham's...
Page 4 - ... state incalculable, yet not able to prevent two complete conquests by a horde of barbarians, or to chastise the piracies of a neighbouring island, or to subdue a petty tribe existing, troublesome and independent, in the centre of a monarchy which seems as if it could crush them by a single movement of its body ; the police of the state...
Page 32 - ... exhibited in their execution. Since the visits of the steamboats to Canton, native artists have filled the country with pictures of ' smoke-ships,' which are now seen on their cloth and paper fans in great numbers. We think Mr. Davis is not correct, in his ' Sketches,
Page 56 - The former implied that we went simply in search of whatever we could pick up, and that performance of the ceremony was to be regarded in no other view than as it affected the question of profit or loss. The Company said, ' Have most regard to the effect that the embassy is to produce at Canton; complain of the conduct of the local authorities to our trade ; and make no concessions, in point of ceremony or reception, which appear calculated to diminish the national respectability of the English at...
Page 3 - ... people all this while not only not plunged in rude ignorance, but actually more generally possessed of knowledge to a certain extent, and more highly prizing it than any other nation in the world ; the institutions of the country established for much above five-and-twenty centuries, and never changing or varying (in principle at least) during that vast period of time; the inhabitants, with all their refinement and their early progress in knowledge and in the arts, never passing a certain low...
Page 260 - OCT. feet of the mountains which lay at a distance ou our left. We were now approaching that part of China which is exposed to the disastrous overflowings of the Yellow river ; perpetual sources of waste, ful expenditure to the government, and of peril and calamity to the people. So incurable, indeed, have been the destructive sallies of this great stream, and so useless is it (from its violence) for the purpose of internal intercourse, that it well deserves the name of China's Sorrow. The European...
Page 270 - be admitted to operate on these two great sources of trouble and expense to the Chinese empire, (the Yellow river and the canal,) a benefit might be conferred that would more than compensate for all the evil that we have inflicted with our opium and our guns.

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