A pilgrimage to my motherland: An account of a journey among the Egbas and Yorubas of Central Africa, in 1859-60

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T. Hamilton, 1861 - Religion - 145 pages
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Page 144 - That the laws of the Egba people shall be strictly respected by the settlers; and, in all matters in which both parties are concerned, an equal number of commissioners, mutually agreed upon, shall be appointed, who shall have power to settle such matters.
Page 144 - That the Commissioners, on their part, also agree that the settlers shall bring with them, as an equivalent for the privileges above accorded, Intelligence, Education, a Knowledge of the Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, and other Mechanical and Industrial Occupations, which they shall put into immediate operation, by improving the lands, and in other useful vocations.
Page 143 - That the King and Chiefs on their part, agree to grant and assign unto the said Commissioners, on behalf of the African race in America, the right and privilege of settling in common with the Egba people, on any part of the territory belonging to Abbeokuta, not otherwise occupied.
Page 138 - ... race." He advocated that emigrants should organize on "municipal" lines. But his goal was that of a "national government" which would require the cooperation and support of native Africans. He therefore advised prospective emigrants to "remember that the existing rulers must be respected, for they alone are the bona fide rulers of the place. The effort should be to lift them up to the proper standard, and not to supersede or crush...
Page 48 - Africa to verify my assertion, that there is not a more industrious people on the face of the earth.
Page 6 - After what is written in the context, if I am still asked what I think of Africa for a colored man to live and do well in, I simply answer, that with as good prospects in America as colored men generally, I have determined, with my wife and children, to go to Africa to live, leaving the inquirer to interpret the reply for himself.
Page 73 - In Campell's view, these emigrants "had inaugurated a mighty work, which . . . must be continued in a higher form by the more civilized of the race." He advocated that emigrants should organize on "municipal" lines. But his goal was that of a "national government" which would require the cooperation and support of native Africans.
Page 51 - African coast, are very numerous. The process of extracting the oil is simple. The nuts are gathered by men. From one to four or five women separate them from the integuments. They are then passed on to other women, who boil them in large earthen pots. Another set crush off the fibre in mortars. This done, they are placed in large clay...
Page 133 - Teneriffe, the nearest Spanish port. No wonder that the slave-trade should be so difficult to suppress when no punishment awaits such wretches. What scamp would fear to embark in such an enterprise if only assured that there was no personal risk ; that he...
Page 2 - LENOX AND TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 1899 Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1858, by CLARK, A.USTIN & SMITH, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York. BY C. A" 15 Vande\-|ita;-Nt v .*'Uetf Ys 10 THOMAS C.

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