Life of General Thomas Pinckney

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1895 - 237 pages
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Page 120 - Majesty's consideration, whether his long imprisonment, and the confiscation of his estates, and the indigence and dispersion of his family, and the painful anxieties incident to all these circumstances, do not form an assemblage of sufferings, which recommend him to the mediation of humanity? Allow me, Sir, on this occasion to be its organ ; and to entreat, that he may be permitted to come to this country, on such conditions and under such restrictions, as your Majesty may think it expedient to...
Page 119 - It will readily occur to your Majesty, that occasions may sometimes exist, on which official considerations would constrain the chief of a nation to be silent and passive in relation even to objects which affect his sensibility, and claim his interposition as a man. Finding myself precisely in this situation at * North American Review.
Page 201 - And the better to obtain this effect, both parties oblige themselves expressly to restrain, by force, all hostilities on the part of the Indian nations living within their boundary : so that Spain will not suffer her Indians to attack the citizens of the United States, nor the Indians inhabiting their territory; nor will the United States permit these last mentioned Indians to commence hostilities against the subjects of his catholic majesty, or his Indians, in any manner whatever.
Page 174 - This Convention doth also declare that no Section or • paragraph of the said Constitution warrants a Construction that the states do not retain every power not expressly relinquished by them and vested in the General Government of the Union.
Page 118 - ... nature for a public character to assume the garb of a private citizen, in a case that does not relate to himself. Yet such is my wish to contribute my mite to accomplish this desirable object, that I have no objection to its being made known to the Imperial ambassador in London, who, if he thinks proper, may communicate it to his court, that this event is an ardent wish of the people of the United States, to which I sincerely add mine. The time, the manner, and even the measure itself, I leave...
Page 171 - I have, some time past, viewed the political concerns of the United States with an anxious and painful eye. They appear to me to be moving by hasty strides to a crisis ; but in what it will result, that Being, who sees, foresees, and directs all things, alone can telL The...
Page 119 - ... they experience, among which his present confinement is not the least distressing. " I forbear to enlarge on this delicate subject. Permit me only to submit to your majesty's consideration, whether his long imprisonment, and the confiscation of his estate, and the indigence and dispersion of his family, and the painful anxieties incident to all these circumstances, do not form an assemblage of sufferings which recommend him to the mediation of humanity 1 Allow me, sir, on this occasion, to be...
Page 21 - I hope, as he would have the blessings of Almighty God, and deserve the Countenance and favour of all good men, and answer my expectations of him, that he will employ all his future abilities in the service of God, and his Country, in the Cause of virtuous liberty as well religious as Civil; and in support of private right and Justice between Man and Man...
Page 128 - Duke de la Alcudia, Lord of the Soto de Roma and of the State of Albala, Grandee of Spain of the first class, perpetual Regidor of the City of Santiago, Knight of the illustrious Order of the Golden Fleece, and Great Cross of the Royal and distinguished Spanish order of Charles the III.
Page 119 - It will readily occur to your majesty that occasions may sometimes exist, on which official considerations would constrain the chief of a nation to be silent and passive in relation even to objects which affect his sensibility and claim his interposition as a man. Finding myself precisely in this situation at present, I take the liberty of writing this private letter to your majesty, being persuaded that my motives will also be my apology for it. " In common with the people of this country, I retain...

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