Spin

Front Cover
Macmillan, Feb 7, 2006 - Fiction - 454 pages
62 Reviews

Spin is Robert Charles Wilson's Hugo Award-winning masterpiece—a stunning combination of a galactic "what if" and a small-scale, very human story.

One night in October when he was ten years old, Tyler Dupree stood in his back yard and watched the stars go out. They all flared into brilliance at once, then disappeared, replaced by a flat, empty black barrier. He and his best friends, Jason and Diane Lawton, had seen what became known as the Big Blackout. It would shape their lives.

The effect is worldwide. The sun is now a featureless disk—a heat source, rather than an astronomical object. The moon is gone, but tides remain. Not only have the world's artificial satellites fallen out of orbit, their recovered remains are pitted and aged, as though they'd been in space far longer than their known lifespans. As Tyler, Jason, and Diane grow up, a space probe reveals a bizarre truth: The barrier is artificial, generated by huge alien artifacts. Time is passing faster outside the barrier than inside—more than a hundred million years per year on Earth. At this rate, the death throes of the sun are only about forty years in our future.

Jason, now a promising young scientist, devotes his life to working against this slow-moving apocalypse. Diane throws herself into hedonism, marrying a sinister cult leader who's forged a new religion out of the fears of the masses.

Earth sends terraforming machines to Mars to let the onrush of time do its work, turning the planet green. Next they send humans...and immediately get back an emissary with thousands of years of stories to tell about the settling of Mars. Then Earth's probes reveal that an identical barrier has appeared around Mars. Jason, desperate, seeds near space with self-replicating machines that will scatter copies of themselves outward from the sun—and report back on what they find.

Life on Earth is about to get much, much stranger.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wealhtheowwylfing - LibraryThing

How the FUCK did this book win a Hugo? It's not hard to explain, I suppose: insert infodumps of "hard" sf every few pages, focus the book on a bland every-man who pines for his untouchable childhood ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RalphLagana - LibraryThing

This is a fine book. I thought it was too light on the sci-fi however. My tastes run to more science-laden works like those of Alastair Reynolds, Jack McDevitt, and Dan Simmons. This is the sort of ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
18
Section 3
37
Section 4
47
Section 5
52
Section 6
70
Section 7
90
Section 8
100
Section 17
256
Section 18
270
Section 19
294
Section 20
302
Section 21
327
Section 22
345
Section 23
352
Section 24
365

Section 9
116
Section 10
131
Section 11
143
Section 12
168
Section 13
188
Section 14
202
Section 15
218
Section 16
235
Section 25
380
Section 26
397
Section 27
407
Section 28
421
Section 29
449
Section 30
453
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

ROBERT CHARLES WILSON was born in California and lives in Toronto. His Darwinia won Canada's Aurora Award and was a finalist for the science fiction's Hugo Award; The Chronoliths was also a Hugo finalist and won the John W. Campbell Award; and his most recent novel, Blind Lake, was a Hugo finalist and a New York Times Notable Book. Earlier, his novel A Hidden Place won the Philip K. Dick Award.