Reviews

User reviews

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This books is mostly fiction. Noam Chomsky does have an imagination but I didn't appreciate how he manipulates and skews information to try and prove his thesis. Moreover, the book is written in a somewhat sleepy fashion. Boring.
In response to the reviewer who wrote, "...actually many of those Guatemalans just walked across Mexico, not that they were planning to go to the US, but just trying to find a place to live and work, and ended up in Florida", Americans don't owe anything to Guatemalans. Americans have enough personal responsibilities without an extra burden from Guatemalans. Guatemalans should settle their own disputes in their own country - Guatemala. " just trying to find a place to live and work"?, aww, pobrecitos. Mexico not good enough for Guatemalans? No jobs in Mexico? Then Guatemalans should revive, create or simply help the economy in Mexico just like Europeans created an economy in the US through blood, sweat,tears, ingenuity and leadership.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

A reviewer above wrote this FALSEHOOD:"This books is mostly fiction. Noam Chomsky does have an imagination but I didn't appreciate how he manipulates and skews information to try and prove his thesis." That reviewer certainly has no foundation for his criticism an is being a Central America Holocaust denier. It is very painful to those of us who suffered to have someone come with no basis and declare it as fiction. Thanks to Chomsky for exposing what we went through. I only wish he had included more about Guatemala and the hell it became due to the CIA backed coup. By the way although I was only in Guatemala, my cousin was at that time in Nicaragua and my now ex-husband was during that time in El Salvador so I was aware of the events over there also, especially since those countries are smaller than most counties in the USA, people mostly go back and forth. Chomsky was one of the very few people to actually denounce this, I wish more people would have believed him so they would have helped us. Too bad all this happened before internet and camera phones. I wish I would have had a camera, so people could see the things I saw when I was 18 that I can't still forget. (and am 52 now).
People are so politicized that don't want to see the truth, they say Chomsky must be lying because he is "left" so everything he says is false and don't want to accept when he is right, but at least with this he is. My criticism only would be that things were actually much worse than what he says, but then again, it is from 1985 and the Guatemalan Peace Accord happened around 1993. Now for all of you who hate the undocumented immigrants maybe this will help you see why they were fleeing, no they couldn't go and ask for visas, when escaping their burning villages, actually many of those Guatemalans just walked across Mexico, not that they were planning to go to the US, but just trying to find a place to live and work, and ended up in Florida.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

It is utterly astonishing how prescient Chomsky is, a couple of decades out, of the undemocratic travesties perpetrated upon the people of the United States and, by corollary, the 'free' world, in the wake of 9/11. He saw the train coming long before many of us even caught a glint of the light. Noam is a real Nostradamus.
His introduction struck a chord immediately: 'we live entangled in webs of endless deceit'. Who can argue? More importantly, he emphasises personal responsibility, identifying this deceit as, sometimes, 'self-deceit'.
His other & further exhortation is for those of us ready and willing to exert 'a little honest effort', to exercise our right, power and opportunity to step back, out and above these sticky labyrinths, to transcend our 'passive acquiescence', realising our own actions contribute meaningfully, and significantly, to 'misery and oppression'. Indeed, he goes further still, pointing to our propensity to be directly or indirectly influential in ensuring 'global destruction'.
I suppose the foregoing makes him the pinup boy for the adage 'if you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem'. While this volume focusses on US intervention in Central America, its vitality and truth reaches well beyond. There can be no better time, surely, to remind ourselves that politics is a process of which we can, and should, all be a part. It is a prerequisite of authentic participatory democracy; one from which we all too easily resile. Unless we re-engage, we really will get the governments we deserve. Which likely means much we'll later feel we don't deserve.
On this basis alone, Turning The Tide is an important book. And a beautifully written one. Empathic, thorough & well-argued.
We can all help turn the tide against corruption, violent intervention, subterfuge and the engines of war. To do so, however, we must rally against the stealthiest sin of all: moral, ethical and intellectual indolence. Noam Chomsky gives the keys to the kingdom back to us. To you. And me.
 

All reviews - 4
4 stars - 0
3 stars - 0
2 stars - 0
1 star - 1

All reviews - 4
Editorial reviews - 0

All reviews - 4