Tao Te Ching: The Poetry of Nature

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Way of Tao Books, May 13, 2009 - 128 pages
Discover a more natural way of being in the world. Inspired by nature, this beautiful interpretation of the Tao te Ching presents timeless wisdom about nature and the human journey. Capturing its original poetic style, this compilation draws from the many ancient sages who studied it. Celebrating what is timeless and valuable about existence, the second section of this book includes a collection of ancient Taoist poetry. "When you lose your place in the world, you need only return to stillness. Through stillness, you return to the Way." Find out why "those who go against the Way end up being called unlucky." Only when you turn back, can you discover peace in existence. "The Way is the refuge for the myriad creatures. Experience shapes them; circumstances bring them maturity." Just as the seed sheds its protective covering before becoming a great oak, experience peels away the layers that keep you from actualizing your destiny.
 

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Like most followers of the Tao Te Ching, I have read many translations, and in one way or another enjoyed them all. So it is amazing to me that there could be this new version by Kari Hohne, which seems at every point to match or exceed the others. The author has the benefit certainly of a 140 years of published English editions preceding her own, and she has not wasted that gift. She takes the work back to the original, lets go of her own agenda, and writes English with a vocabulary rooted in the heart - that is the way of the Tao and the best translations also. She is right up there with Ursula K. Le Guin, Arthur Waley, Stephen Mitchell, and Ellen M. Chen. There is also a fine, two-part introduction, as well as a separate section with examples of Taoist poetry, which helps to locate the Tao Te Ching in the realm of spiritual art, as much as religious philosophy. 

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Contents

Great Fullness Seems Empty
58
If You Are Content
59
Without Going Out the Door
60
Order Returns To the World
61
Thus Goodness Grows
62
You Come In and Go Out
63
The Way Gives Them Life
64
The World Has a Beginning
65

Never Full
20
The Mysterious Mirror
21
Return to the Center
22
Nourish the Belly Not the Eye
23
Without Distinction
24
The Form of the Formless
25
So Subtle and Profound
26
Return to Stillness
27
It Happens Naturally
28
Without Wisdom
29
Without Knowledge
30
I Alone Am Inactive
31
How Do I Know?
32
Contentment is Simple
33
Conform to Nature
34
Only Harmony Endures
35
There Is A Thing Confusedly Formed
36
The Root of the Light
37
Use No Counting Rods
38
Return to the Uncarved Block
39
It Cannot Be Contained
40
Force Is Not Necessary
41
Value Turning Back
42
Know When to Stop
43
Whether Strength or Weakness
44
Tao Claims No Authority
45
Used Yet Not Exhausted
46
The Nature of Things
47
Nothing is Undone
48
The Beginning of Disorder
49
Using the Inferior as a Base
51
It Turns Back
52
Forward and Backward
53
It Produces the Two
55
The Most Submissive
56
Know When to Stop
57
The Great Way is Easy
66
To Know the Person
67
If The Grasp Is Firm
68
Those Who Know Untangle The Knots
69
Remain Simple Like an Uncarved Block
70
The People Have Not Been Perplexed
71
Having Nothing to Overcome
72
With Care That Does Not Harm
73
The Converging Point of Many Streams
74
The Place Where the Bad Finds Refuge
75
Approach the Difficulty While it is Easy
76
The Transition is Easy
77
Knowledge Can Rob Enlightenment
79
Tao Pushes Them Tirelessly
80
What the Way Provides
81
One Has No Need to Engage
82
I Dare Not Play the Host
83
My Words Have an Ancient Beginning
84
To Know But To Think You Dont Know Is Best
85
They Will Follow Naturally
86
Who Knows What Heaven Dislikes
87
The Great Carpenter Cuts
88
Those That Do Not Seek After Life
89
Be Supple and Pliant
90
The High it Brings Down
91
Straightforward Words Seem Paradoxical
92
How Can This Be Good
93
Let the People Return
94
To the Tao
95
Taoist Poetry
97
WinterSpring
100
SpringSummer
102
SummerAutumn
104
AutumnWinter
106
Meditations
110
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About the author (2009)

Kari Hohne is an author who bridges the gap between environmental consciousness and spirituality. As a pioneer of dream research, she presents the common "hero" cycles in dreams and the three parts of every dream showing conflict, cause and resolution. She has also authored popular translations of the I Ching and Tao te Ching. Visit www.cafeausoul.com

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