Knowledge: Critical Concepts, Volume 1

Front Cover
Nico Stehr, Reiner Grundmann
Taylor & Francis, 2005 - Philosophy - 390 pages
This five volume collection brings together a carefully selected array of contributions from a variety of disciplines. Featuring essays from philosophers who have investigated the foundations of knowledge, and addressing different forms of knowledge in society such as common sense and practical knowledge, this collection also discusses the role of knowledge in economic process and gives attention to the role of expert knowledge in political decision making.
Including a collection of articles from the sociology of knowledge and science, the set also provides a new introduction and full index by the editors, making it a unique and invaluable research resource for both student and scholar.
Coverage includes:
1. Foundations of Knowledge
- Knowledge, Experience and Mind
- Knowledge and Reality
- Knowledge and Skepticism
- Knowledge and Ignorance
- Knowledge and Uncertainty
2: Knowledge and Society: Forms of Knowledge
- Everyday Knowledge
- Practical knowledge
- Tacit knowledge
- Secret Knowledge
- Scientific Knowledge
- Hermeneutics
- Knowledge Construction
- Indigenous (traditional) knowledge
3: Knowledge and the Economy
- The Economics of Knowledge
- Knowledge and Organisations
- Knowledge Acquisition
- Knowledge Based Systems (firms)
- Knowledge Management
- Knowledge and Information
- Knowledge and Law
4: Politics and Knowledge
- Science and Policy-Making
- The Power of Ideas and Discourse
- The Politics of Knowledge
5: Sociology of Knowledge and Science
- Classical Perspectives
- Modern Views
- Science Studies
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

The describe various judgmental heuristics and the biases they produce, not only in laboratory experiments but in important social, medical, and political situations as well. Individual chapters discuss the representativeness and availability heuristics, problems in judging covariation and control, overconfidence, multistage inference, social perception, medical diagnosis, risk perception, and methods for correcting and improving judgments under uncertainty. About half of the chapters are edited versions of classic articles; the remaining chapters are newly written for this book. Most review multiple studies or entire subareas of research and application rather than describing single experimental studies. This book will be useful to a wide range of students and researchers, as well as to decision makers seeking to gain insight into their judgments and to improve them.
“Chance is commonly viewed as a self-correcting process in which a deviation in one direction induces a deviation in the opposite direction to restore the equilibrium. In fact, deviations are not "corrected" as a chance process unfolds, they are merely diluted.
 

Contents

General Introduction
1
PART
8
A new concept of ideology?
21
Extracts from The Principles of Philosophy
25
Sociology and theory of knowledge
40
Extracts from An Essay Concerning Human Understanding
43
PART 15
56
Extracts from A Treatise Concerning the Principles
60
PART 16
163
PART 9
164
PART 10
171
Theses on Feuerbach
176
The invention of disciplines
177
implications for the sociology
184
Brains in a vat
192
Science Studies
205

Modern Views
75
interpreting policy
77
Extracts from An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
81
The nature and necessity of scientific revolutions
87
Introduction and Preamble from Prolegomena
96
Tacit Knowledge
99
The Popperian versus the Kuhnian research programme
101
Two dogmas of empiricism
117
The problem of the sociology of knowledge
123
How to make our ideas clear
137
classification
139
Knowledge and Organizations
149
Extract from On the Most Ancient Wisdom of the Italians
153
Philosophy without mirrors
208
The hermeneutic significance of temporal distance
221
Truth and the growth of scientific knowledge
224
a methodological survey
244
The sociology of knowledge 63
245
Empiricism semantics and ontology
267
Extract from On Certainty
283
Index
285
Three views concerning human knowledge
306
Some social functions of ignorance
333
Toward a social theory of ignorance
346
heuristics and biases
371
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information