Maritime Sector, Institutions, and Sea Power of Premodern China

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999 - Business & Economics - 289 pages

Challenging the stereotype of premodern China as an agricultural nation, this book examines the development of the maritime sector, maritime institutions, and sea power in the premodern era. Initially discussing topics related to China's exports, such as ship design and construction, goods produced solely for export, capital accumulation and investment in the maritime sector, and trade networking, the volume goes on to consider the impact of maritime institutions, governmental trade and non-trade policies, and Confucian attitudes toward maritime activities.

Finally, the book shows how China obtained technological, economic, and naval supremacy in Asian waters until the 18th century and goes on to discuss the reasons for the decline of the maritime sector in the 19th century.

 

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Contents

Maritime Sector and Backward Linkages
1
Maritime Sector and Forward Linkages
57
Maritime Institutions
107
Chinas Sea Power
163
Decline of Chinas Sea Power
201
Conclusion
221
Portrelated PlaceNames in China
229
Chinese Merchants and the Japanese Market
233
Features of the Northern Sea Fleet
241
References
245
Index
277
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About the author (1999)

GANG DENG is Lecturer in Economic History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His earlier books include Development Versus Stagnation: Technological Continuity and Agricultural Progress in Pre-modern China (Greenwood, 1993) and Chinese Maritime Activities and Socioeconomic Development, C. 2100-1900 A.D. (Greenwood, 1997).

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