The Essex Antiquarian, Volume 3

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Sidney Perley
Essex Antiquarian, 1899 - Essex County (Mass.)
 

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Page 54 - Birds ceased to sing, and all the barnyard fowls Roosted; the cattle at the pasture bars Lowed, and looked homeward; bats on leathern wings Flitted abroad; the sounds of labor died; Men prayed, and women wept; all ears grew sharp To hear the doom-blast of the trumpet shatter The black sky, that the dreadful face of Christ Might look from the rent clouds, not as he looked A loving guest at Bethany, but stern As Justice and inexorable Law. Meanwhile in the old State House, dim as ghosts, Sat the lawgivers...
Page 27 - Every man of an immense crowded audience appeared to me to go away as I did, ready to take arms against writs of assistance. Then and there was the first scene of the first act of opposition to the arbitrary claims of Great Britain. Then and there the child Independence was born. In fifteen years, ie in 1776, he grew up to manhood and declared himself free.
Page 53 - Twas on a May-day of the far old year Seventeen hundred eighty, that there fell Over the bloom and sweet life of the Spring, Over the fresh earth and the heaven of noon, A horror of great darkness, like the night In day of which the Norland sagas tell, — The Twilight of the Gods.
Page 53 - Stamford sent up to the councils of the State Wisdom and grace in Abraham Davenport. 'Twas on a May-day of the far old year Seventeen hundred eighty, that there fell Over the bloom and sweet life of the Spring, Over the fresh earth and the heaven of noon, A horror of darkness, like the night In day of which the Norland sagas tell, — The Twilight of the Gods.
Page 27 - Otis was a flame of fire ! With a promptitude of classical allusions, a depth of research, a rapid summary of historical events and dates, a profusion of legal authorities, a prophetic glance of his eye into futurity, and a torrent of impetuous eloquence, he hurried away everything before him. American Independence was then and there born; the seeds of patriots and heroes were then and there sown.
Page 121 - O bright little garden beside the plantation, Where the tall fleurs-de-lis their blue banners unfurled, And the lawn was alive with the thrushes and blackbirds, I would you were all I had known of the world ! " My sweet pink pea-clusters ! My rare honeysuckle ! My prim polyanthuses all of a row ! In a garden of dreams I still pass and caress you, But your beautiful selves are forever laid low.
Page 147 - Boston against him, with some Remarks on a Pamphlet of his in Form of a Letter to a Friend. By John Moorhead, Jonathan Parsons, and David Macgregorie.
Page 27 - When flushed with conquest and elate with pride, Britannia's monarch Heaven's high will defied; And bent on blood, by lust of rule inclined, With odious chains to vex the freeborn mind; On these young shores set up unjust command, And spread the slaves of office round the land; Then Otis rose, and great in patriot fame, To listening crowds resistance dared proclaim. From soul to soul the bright idea ran, The fire of freedom flew from man to man : His pen, like Sydney's, made the doctrine known, His...
Page 183 - ... and attainments gained for him the respect and confidence of all who knew him ; they however were but few, for he was retired and modest, and so easily confused by severity and impudence, that it was difficult to understand his character, or to make a just estimate of his acquirements. After leaving college, he taught a school for a year or more, and then entered the office of JOHN ABBOTT, Esq. a...
Page 146 - I found," says he in his journal, "a number of serious Christians in the congregation which I came to visit, who appeared to be understanding, solid, and in some measure established in the main points of Christian doctrine. But many others appeared of an Antinomian turn, full of vain confidence, selfconceit, false affections, &,c., and some that were the greatest Christians in their own esteem, appeared to be worldly, and covetous.

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