The Date of Mark's Gospel: Insight from the Law in Earliest Christianity

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A&C Black, Jun 15, 2004 - Religion - 245 pages
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This book argues that Mark's gospel was not written as late as c. 65-75 CE, but dates from sometime between the late 30s and early 40s CE. It challenges the use of the external evidence (such as Irenaeus and Clement of Alexandria) often used for dating Mark, relying instead on internal evidence from the gospel itself. James Crossley also questions the view that Mark 13 reflects the Jewish war, arguing that there are other plausible historical settings.

Crossley argues that Mark's gospel takes for granted that Jesus fully observed biblical law and that Mark could only make such an assumption at a time when Christianity was largely law observant: and this could not have been later than the mid-40s, from which point on certain Jewish and gentile Christians were no longer observing some biblical laws (e.g. food, Sabbath).

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About the author (2004)

James G. Crossley is Lecturer in New Testament studies in the Department of Biblical Studies at University of Sheffield, UK. He is the author of Jesus in an Age of Terror: Scholarly Projects for a New American Century (London: Equinox, forthcoming 2008/9); Why Christianity Happened: A Sociohistorical Account of Christian Origins 26-50CE (Louisville: WJK, 2006); The Date of Mark's Gospel: Insight from the Law in Earliest Christianity (London: T&T Clark/Continuum, 2004) and co-author, with M. F. Bird, of Two Views of Christian Origins: A Secular-Evangelical Debate London: SPCK, forthcoming 2008). He is co-edited (with Christian Karner) Writing History, Constructing Religion (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005).

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