The Oriental Herald, Volume 7

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Page 246 - Wisdom's self Oft seeks to sweet retired solitude ; Where, with her best nurse, Contemplation, She plumes her feathers, and lets grow her wings, That in the various bustle of resort Were all too ruffled, and sometimes impair'd. He that has light within his own clear breast, May sit i...
Page 438 - Her lot is on you — silent tears to weep, And patient smiles to wear through suffering's hour, And sumless riches, from affection's deep, To pour on broken reeds — a wasted shower ! And to make idols, and to find them clay, And to bewail that worship. Therefore pray...
Page 438 - tis lovely! — Childhood's lip and cheek, Mantling beneath its earnest brow of thought — Gaze — yet what seest thou in those fair, and meek, And fragile things, as but for sunshine wrought? — Thou seest what grief must nurture for the sky, What death must fashion for eternity ! O ! joyous creatures ! that will sink to rest.
Page 37 - Origines, or Remarks on the Origin of several Empires, States, and Cities,
Page 438 - tis a holy hour. The quiet room Seems like a temple, while yon soft lamp sheds A faint and starry radiance, through the gloom And the sweet stillness, down on...
Page 244 - It is indifferent for judges and magistrates: for if they be facile and corrupt, you shall have a servant five times worse than a wife. For soldiers, I find the generals commonly, in their hortatives, put men in mind of their wives and children.
Page 501 - A REFLECTION AT SEA. SEE how, beneath the moonbeam's smile, Yon little billow heaves its breast, And foams and sparkles for a while, And murmuring then subsides to rest. Thus man, the sport of bliss and care, Rises on Time's eventful sea ; And, having swell'da moment there, Thus melts into eternity ! AN INVITATION TO SUPPER TO MRS.
Page 53 - That realm of old, a ruin huge, was rent In length of ages from the continent. "With force convulsive burst the isle away ; Through the dread opening broke the thund'ring sea : At once the thund'ring sea Sicilia tore. And sunder'd from the fair Hesperian shore ; And still the neighbouring coasts and towns divides With scanty channels, and contracted tides. Fierce to the right tremendous Scylla roars, Charybdis tn the left the flood devours.
Page 47 - Wherever their myriads spread, the verdure of the country disappears ; trees and plants stripped of their leaves, and reduced to their naked boughs and stems, cause the dreary image of winter to succeed in an instant to the rich scenery of the spring.
Page 47 - I mean those clouds of locusts so often mentioned by travellers. The quantity of these insects is incredible to all who have not themselves witnessed their astonishing numbers ; the whole earth is covered with them for the space of several leagues. The noise they make in browsing on the trees and herbage, may be heard at a great distance, and resembles that of an army in secret. The Tartars themselves are a less destructive enemy than these little animals. One would imagine that fire had followed...

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