A Practical Grammar of the Sanskrit Language: Part I. Including the Whole of the Orthography, Or the First Principles of the Grammar, and the Permutations of the Letters, Also a Part of Etymology, Part 1

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published and sold by T. Ostell & Company, from the Serampore Press, 1835 - 15 pages
 

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Page iv - Bramins, and appropriated solely to the records of their religion, appears to have been current over most part of the Oriental world ; and traces of its original extent may still be discovered in almost every district of Asia."* Mr. Colebrooke is equally decisive, and still more precise in his statement. "The Sanscrit...
Page iii - The lover of science, the antiquary, the historian, the moralist, the poet, and the man of taste, will obtain in Sanskrit books an inexhaustible fund of information and amusement. Besides the Vedas, there exist at this day numerous original treatises of considerable antiquity, on astronomy...
Page iv - I have been astonished to find this similitude of Sanskrit words with those of Persian and Arabic, and even of Latin and Greek ; and these not in technical and metaphorical terms, which the mutuation of refined arts and improved manners might have occasionally introduced ; but in the main groundwork of language, in monosyllables, in the names of numbers, and the appellations of such things as could be first discriminated on the immediate dawn of civilisation.
Page vi - Sanscrit, a most polished tongue, which was gradually refined until it became fixed in the classic writings of many elegant poets, most of whom are supposed to have flourished in the century preceding the Christian asra. It is cultivated by learned Hindus throughout India, as the language of science and of literature, and as the repository of their law civil and religious.
Page iv - grand source of Indian literature, the parent of almost every " dialect from the Persian Gulph to the China Seas, is the Sanskrit ; " a language of the most venerable and unfathomable antiquity...
Page v - Cashmiria, and many other king" doms, are all stampt with Shanscrit letters, and mostly contain allusions " to the old Shanscrit mythology. The same conformity I have observed " on the impressions of seals from Bootan and Thibet.
Page vii - The frowning rock or foaming cataract, the furious tyrant or undaunted patriot, are not to be traced in Sanscrit verse ; but we shall frequently meet with the impassioned lover or affectionate husband, with the unobtrusive blossoms of the flower and the evanescent tints of the sky. In point of language Sanscrit writers are certainly...
Page vii - To whatever name or period the Cloud Messenger may be assigned, it is the production of a poet. The circumstances of eastern society and climate tend, in a great measure, to exclude sublimity, either moral or physical, from their literary compositions; but the same circumstances are favourable to the less awful graces of poetry, to the elegantly minute observation of nature, and the tender expression of natural sensibility.
Page vii - LORDSHIP'S Most obedient Servant, HH WILSON. Cakutta, llth September, 1813. PREFACE. THE antiquity and excellence of the sacred language of the Hindus, have naturally attracted attention, and excited curiosity. Possessing considerable claims to be regarded as the most ancient form of speech with which mankind is acquainted, it appeals strongly to the interest that invests the early ages of the world ; and constructed upon perhaps the most perfect plan which human ingenuity has devised, it tempts...
Page vii - Sanscrit writers are certainly not surpassed, and perhaps unequalled, and their style in general is as full as it is sweet, as majestic as it is harmonious. The exceeding copiousness of the language sometimes leads them into those tricks of composition, which formerly exercised the misdirected ingenuity of Europe, and puns, and quibbles, and endless alliteration constitute the stanza. Their attention also to minute objects sometimes terminates in quaintness and affectation; but from the faults of...

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