Reviews

PRIZE FIGHT: The Race and the Rivalry to Be the First in Science

Editorial Review - Kirkus - Jane Doe

Meyers (Radiology and Medicine/School of Medicine, SUNY Stony Brook; Happy Accidents: Serendipity in Modern Medical Breakthroughs, 2007, etc.) examines distortions in the process of assigning credit for major scientific discoveries.The author thinks reform is necessary to encourage creativity despite the financial pressures of competitive team science. He debunks the "dogma that science is self ... Read full review

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LMHTWB - LibraryThing

Science is about discovery, about unlocking the truth, about winning prizes and gaining recognition. This is the message of Prize Fight. The author looks at the researchers and what they will do to ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kidzdoc - LibraryThing

This was a good exploration of rivalries in science, and how they can adversely impact the scientific process by encouraging researchers to not cooperate with each other. I was particularly interested in the Selman Waksman controversy, and this was covered quite well. Read full review

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Dr. M. Rafiqul Awal (dr.rafiqul.awal@gmail.com)
I have bought the book twice and read twice, esp. the sad saga on MRI. Cool facts, hitherto unknown, researched and served in this rare-of-its-kind
book by Prof. Morton Meyers have given us thought provoking stories that are as important as the great contributions that Nobel-recognized discoveries and inventions have given to our civilization! The very brief reference to the crucial contributions of Dr. Waylon V. House has been testified to me by Dr. House himself, who's now my colleague at Texas Tech (Dept of Petroleum Engineering). I have heard the "rest of the story", right from the horse’s mouth, that I wish Prof. Meyers could include in this book. The untold yet very important story relates to the design conceptions, invention and fabrication of key technology hardware and software that modern MRI needed to be born, and these were NOT done by the “official” inventor—Prof. Paul Lauterbur. It was the young and genius that MIT had produced--Waylon to be precise, that Paul had to approach and employ as a post doctorate. Working with another genius, Ching-Ming Lai, Waylon built the complete MRI machine, and took the FIRST modern MRI image of a jalapeno that knocked the socks off those attending the first press conference addressed by Paul to herald to the world about the birth of modern MRI. Yet when asked by journalists if there were some other bright minds behind this birth, Paul answered in the negative. The author, Prof. Morton Meyers couldn’t tell us if Paul had lied through his teeth. But Waylon is still alive, not fuming in rage at Paul but opting to bury his sad saga. I am truly privileged to have earned his friendship that led to a long audience from him. He wouldn’t even do that had I not earned his empathy for the cavalier attitude that my own humble invention has fetched from stakeholders (“Plasma Stimulation & Fracturing,” a non-hydraulic “fracking” invention since February 2010 but not heralded to the world for IP right protection).
So this wonderful book is INCOMPLETE by all means. As the “official” inventor of MRI, Paul has died with the Nobel in his name, without ever recognizing the truth that he had hired Dr. House in order to accomplish what he (Paul, being a chemistry professor) or others that he knew could never achieve. Dr. House, a world-class physicist and also wizard of electronics and computer programming (in 1970s) had conceived, designed, built the crucial powerful magnets, assembled, and tested with the jalapeņo that could be inserted within the small magnet, based on the conceptual field gradient trick credited rightly to Paul. I do not blame Prof. Meyers for his half-cooked story on MRI, but with a little more COURAGE and a resolve to complete this mega story for the sake of TRUTH would earn him no less credit than a Nobel Prize in itself. That is my humble opinion. Let him unleash the Might of the Pen! For Sure, the Nobel Committee will not care for Waylon, nor does Waylon crave (or ever craved) it, or if Paul would turn in his grave and come back to complete “the rest of the story,” but many more brilliant minds will surely find it more soothing, more hopeful, and perhaps worth committing even more of their bright minds to create a better world for tomorrow, and entities like the Nobel Committee will hopefully be more stringent to ensure that their collective judgment leaves fewer pages to be added to the sad saga that Prof. Morton Meyer has single handedly chronicled for the posterity.
 

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