Four Years in Burmah, Volume 1

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C.J. Skeet, 1860 - Burma
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Page 18 - ... If that letter be written by order of the King of Ava, I must lament that persons utterly incompetent to form a just notion of the state of the British power in India, have ventured to practise on the judgment of so dignified a sovereign. Any hopes those individuals may have held out to His Majesty that the British Government would be embarrassed by contests in other quarters are altogether vain, and this Government must be indifferent to attack, further than as it would regard with concern the...
Page 18 - ... had really been written by order of the king of Ava, his Excellency lamented, that persons so incompetent to form a just notion of the power of the British nation in India, should have been able to practise on the king's judgment; that any hopes which the king might have been induced to entertain, that the British Government would be embarrassed by contests in other quarters, were entirely delusive; that we were indifferent to attack from the king of Ava, further than, as we should regard with...
Page 17 - Excellency lamented that persons so incompetent tent to form n just notion of the power of the British nation in India should have been able to practise on the King's judgment ; that any hopes which the King might have been induced to entertain, that the British Government would be embarrassed by contests in other quarters, were entirely delusive ; that we were indifferent to attack from the King of Ava, further than as we should regard with concern...
Page 53 - ... works of the enemy. The Burmese seemed determined to provoke a war. At length, on the 10th or 12th of February, it was decided by the Indian Government to send an expedition to Burmah. It was conjectured that, if actual hostilities should not ultimately become necessary, the appearance of an armament might probably excite the apprehensions of the Burmese, and induce them to yield to the just demands of the British.
Page 139 - When this thalay rice was put in a stone cup without any apparent cause, flames came and it was cooked. In appearance it was like the flower of jasmine. Fruit, meats, and other kinds of food came according to the people's taste. 'The first kind of food, like the food of the Nats, appeased hunger, and afforded nourishment to the body; and being of a mild nature, no excrement was formed; but when they came to eat the thalay rice, it being a coarse substance, the passages for...
Page iv - Albion, but who can foresee what complications may arise out of the ill-assorted alliance ? Who can tell, that after forcing submission from the Celestials, the arms of France may not be turned against Cochin-China, as a step towards that acquisition of territory in the south of Burmah, which...
Page 18 - ... wholly destroyed ; and that if, as the GovernorGeneral could not but believe, the Rajah of Ramree had, for some unworthy purpose of his own, assumed the tone of insolence and menace exhibited in his letter, without the authority of the King, he hoped that a procedure so calculated to breed dissentions between two friendly states, would be visited by the King with the severe displeasure it deserved."* The events of the Mahratta contest, which had not terminated at the epoch of this demand, seem...
Page 123 - Some Europeans here are married to Burmese women, and some who are not married, have Burmese women at the head of their respective households. Several whom I know have large families by such connections, and no one here objects to their society on the score of their immoral living.
Page 18 - Ava, further than as we should regard with concern the waste of lives in an unmeaning quarrel ; that his Excellency trusted, however, that the King would perceive the folly of the counsellors who would plunge him into a calamitous war, by which the commerce of his empire would be wholly destroyed ; and that if, as the GovernorGeneral could not but believe, the Rajah of Ramree had, for some unworthy purpose of his own, assumed the tone of insolence and menace exhibited in his letter, without the authority...
Page 141 - Bud dha) just in all his proportions beyond other men, and perfect in his members, of most excellent power and sanctity, and great wisdom, who could degrade or exalt. Having gone to this man, they preferred their request, and poured over him the three kinds of beiktheik.

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