The Book of Memory: A Study of Memory in Medieval Culture

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Cambridge University Press, May 14, 1992 - History - 393 pages
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The Book of Memory is a magisterial and beautifully illustrated account of the workings and function of memory in medieval society. Memory was the psychological faculty valued above all others in the period stretching from late antiquity through the Renaissance. The prominence given to memory has profound implications for the contemporary understanding of all creative activity, and the social role of literature and art. Drawing on a range of fascinating examples from Dante, Chaucer, and Aquinas to the symbolism of illuminated manuscripts, this unusually wide-ranging book offers new insights into the medieval world.
 

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Contents

Models for the memory
16
Descriptions of the neuropsychology of memory
46
Elementary memory design
80
The arts of memory
122
Memory and the ethics of reading
156
Memory and authority
189
Memory and the book
221
Afterword
258
Appendix A
261
Appendix B
267
Appendix C
281
Notes
289
Bibliography
351
Index of manuscripts
372
General index
374
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Mary Carruthers is the author of The Craft of Thought (Cambridge 1998) and The Medieval Craft of Memory (University of Pennsylvania 2002) as well as of The Book of Memory (1990 and 2008). She divides her time between New York City and Oxford, where she holds the positions of Remarque Professor of Literature at New York University and Fellow of All Souls College.

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