Bumblebees: Their Behaviour and Ecology

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2003 - Science - 235 pages
0 Reviews
Bumblebees have always been favoured subjects for scientific study, and research has accelerated in recent years. Many new discoveries have been made with regard to their ecology and social behaviour. Over the last twenty years the world has seen the commercialisation of bumblebee breeding for pollination, and the invasion of new parts of the globe by bumblebee species, with potentially far-reaching consequences. Despite this, there is still a great deal that we do not know about bumblebees. Their nests are so hard to locate that those of some species have never been found and aspects of behaviour, such as mating, have not been seen in many species. Bumblebees are undergoing a widespread decline, an issue that has yet to reach the public to the same extent as the plight of rare butterflies or birds. This is a cause for concern as the bumblebee is of far greater ecological and economic importance than these groups because the pollination of crops and the survival of many wildflowers depend upon them. Goulson has successfully drawn attention to the importance of conserving dwindling bumblebee populations, as well as bringing together the current state of knowledge of the behaviour and ecology of these fascinating and charismatic insects, and identifying some of the many gaps that remain in the hope of stimulating further research
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
11 Evolution and Phylogeny
2
12 The Life Cycle
4
Thermoregulation
11
22 Controlling Heat Loss
13
23 Thermoregulation of the Nest
15
Social organization and conflict
19
32 Division of Labour
22
812 Nonrandom choice of patches
87
82 The Marginal Value Theorem
88
Choice of flower species
95
91 Flower Constancy
96
911 Explanations for flower constancy
97
912 Can flowers be cryptic?
102
92 Infidelity in Flower Choice
105
Intraspecific floral choices
107

33 Sex Determination
30
34 Control of Reproduction and QueenWorker Conflicts
31
341 Timing of reproduction
33
342 Matricide
35
35 Sexratios in Bombus
36
36 Sexratios in Psithyrus
39
Finding a mate
41
42 Nest Surveillance
42
44 Inbreeding Avoidance
45
45 Evolution of Male Matelocation Behaviour
46
47 Monogamy versus Polyandry
47
Natural enemies
53
52 Parasitoids
55
522 Sarcophagidae Diptera
57
524 Mutilidae Hymenoptera
58
533 Fungi
59
535 Nematodes
61
536 Mites Acarina
63
537 Other commensals
64
55 Social Parasitism
65
552 Cuckoo bees Psithyrus
66
Foraging economics
69
Foraging range
73
71 Studies with Marked Bees
74
73 Harmonic Radar
77
74 Modelling Maximum Foraging Range
78
75 So Why do not Bumblebees Forage Close to their Nests?
79
Exploitation of patchy resources
83
81 The Ideal Free Distribution
84
102 Flower Size
108
104 Flower Sex
109
105 Flower Symmetry
110
Communication during foraging
113
Competition in bumblebee communities
123
Bumblebees as pollinators
129
1311 Honeybees versus bumblebees
130
1312 Approaches to enhancing bumblebee pollination
132
132 Pollination of Wild Flowers
137
1321 Nectar robbing
138
Conservation
143
141 Causes of Declining Bumblebee Numbers
144
1412 Loss of nest and hibernation sites
146
1414 Effects of habitat fragmentation
148
142 Population Structure
149
143 Why are Some Bumblebee Species Still Abundant?
151
144 Consequences of Declining Bumblebee Numbers
152
145 Conservation Strategies
153
Bumblebees abroad effects of introduced bees on native ecosystems
161
151 Competition with Native Organisms for Floral Resources
163
1511 Effects on foraging of native organisms
164
1512 Evidence for populationlevel changes in native organisms
166
152 Competition for Nest Sites
169
154 Effects on Pollination of Native Flora
170
155 Pollination of Exotic Weeds
172
156 Conclusions
174
References
177
Index
229
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Dr Dave Goulson Biodiversity and Ecology Division, School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton, SO16 7PX, UK 02380 594212 (work) 02380 594269 dg@soton.ac.uk Senior Lecturer, Division of Biodiversity and Ecology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton. Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society

Bibliographic information