Crazy Love: Dealing with Your Partner's Problem Personality

Front Cover
Impact Publishers, 2007 - Psychology - 233 pages
2 Reviews
The scenario is all too common: Girl meets guy (or Guy meets girl). Guy is smart, charming, and maybe even endearing. Girl falls in love. As the relationship progresses Guy's serious personality problems begin to surface. She gets longer and more vivid glimpses of habits and tendencies she didn't notice at first. With about 15% of the adult population suffering from one or more personality disorders - that's over 16 million potential relationship partners, says the National Institutesof Health - finding the right partner and maintaining a healthy love relationship is harder work than we thought! Crazy Love sheds light on the odd but surprisingly common disorders of personality so that readers can become better informed and more careful when entering or continuing a relationship. Johnson and Murray tell us why so many of us are attracted to personality disordered partners, and-most important-they offer strategies for detecting and avoiding such potential disasters. They also recognize the needs of readers who are already in committed relationships with personality-impaired partners, and offerhope in the form of healthy survival strategies and tips for making the relationship more livable.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is about finding negative aspects of each personality type and exaggerating it. it motivates people to get more negative about their partners and moving toward to divorce their partners instead finding solutions and working to grow together. Even though the author is well educated and well known, the book is very negative and I do not recommend it at all. It will weaken your relation ship instead of helping it to strengthen. 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

"...Realistic expectations for these relationships are offered along with extremely well-informed, practical advice." -- Counseling Today, January 2008
"Of particular help are revelations on why
the reader might be attracted to certain types and tips for making better choices in the future...excellent...recommended for libraries." -- Library Journal
"Realistic expectations for these relationships are offered along with extremely well-informed, practical advice." -- Counseling Today, January 2008
This riveting and easy to read guide to relationships and disorders was a big help to me. In terms that are not psycho-babble, the various personality disorders are laid out in order of severity. The reader is given detailed analysis and descriptions to help match a disorder to the person you might be with, along with with cautions for being in the relationship. Over and over the basic mantra is slow down, listen to what they say, observe what they do, take your time, meet your partners family and friends, be healthy yourself and get out if it isn't working for you.
-M. Niehaus
 

Contents

The Weird Partner Detection and Survival Guide
1
Understanding Weird Partners
7
How Could I Be Attracted to PDPs? Let Me Count the top Nine Ways
17
Odd Eccentric and Weird Partners
29
The Paranoid Personality
31
The Schizoid Personality
45
The Schizotypal Personality
61
The Antisocial Personality
77
The PassiveAggressive Personality
143
Anxious Withdrawn and Needy Partners
159
The Avoidant Personality
161
The Dependent Personality
175
The ObsessiveCompulsive Personality
189
The Depressive Personality
207
Some Final Thoughts
221
What If Im Married to a PersonalityDisordered Partner?
223

The Borderline Personality
95
The Histrionic Personality
113
The Narcissistic Personality
127

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

W. Brad Johnson, PhD, is professor of psychology in the department of leadership, ethics, and law at the United States Naval Academy and a faculty associate in the Graduate School of Education at Johns Hopkins University. He is a clinical psychologist and former lieutenant commander in the Navy's Medical Service Corps.
Kelly Murray, PhD, is an Assistant Professor and Director of Ph.D. Clinical Education at Loyola College in Baltimore. She is also a clinical psychologist who is in private practice in Bethesda, Maryland where she works and writes in the areas of personality disorders, relationships and trauma.

Bibliographic information