Reports of Progress, Volume 4

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Yeoman Press, 1878 - Geology
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Page 173 - Subconglomerate coals. In this report the term is used without reference to any general classification of the Carboniferous rocks of this field. In Greenup and Carter it was found that these shales were present, though not always separated from the shales above the Conglomerate, the Conglomerate sandstone being entirely wanting near the Ohio river, in places, but becoming prominent to the southwest.* In that region the lower limestone ore, a thin coal, and a thick bed of non-plastic fire-clay, are...
Page 180 - C .60 1. 100 1.300 1.319 1.301 1.300 that the apparent barrenness of the hill country, where cleared, so belies the natural fertility of the soil. Well directed enterprise in farming would do very much to offset the disadvantages of a hilly and broken surface. TIMBER. The timber of Menifee includes the following species, besides some others, which doubtless have been overlooked, no time having been at command for a special study of this subject. For a general view of the distribution of species,...
Page 272 - Jackson it is only one hundred feet, while above this it descends still more rapidly, until, at the mouth of Quicksand creek, it is at the level of low water in the river. From this point to the end of the section the dip changes, and the rocks are horizontal, or nearly so. From some observations...
Page 177 - IV, old series, page 454. 20J. 'ings of this bed as noted in this region. On the Old State Road branch, above Frenchburg, the ore is particularly abundant on the surface, as also at some points along the face of •the ridge between the upper Beaver valley and the head of Salt Lick.
Page 178 - Sub-conglomerate beds are below the drainage, except near the Licking river. Most of that part of Blackwater creek which is within Menifee has its bed in the Conglomerate sandstone. The Sub-conglomerate beds are, therefore, of little economic value east of the Beaver Creek valley. In this part of Menifee the hills are capped by the shales above the Conglomerate. (See profile section.) These shales usually include one or two coals. In this belt no coals of considerable thickness have been observed....
Page 279 - It has 278 never been dug into or opened, and nothing is known as to its thickness. It is the coal before referred to as probably the first coal above No. 3. On Troublesome creek, about fifteen miles from its mouth, below the mouth of Buckhorn creek, on the Roberts farm, is a coal which shows the following section : Bituminous coal Shale parting . Bituminous coal Shale parting . Cannel coal . . 1' 10" lo" 10" A total thickness of five feet one inch coal.
Page 274 - In character, it is usually a distinctly laminated and dry-burning coal, with considerable fibrous coal or mineral charcoal between the laminae. At places portions of it are bituminous enough to coke, but this is not its general character. The...
Page 277 - ... feet in thickness; but it had caved in at the time of examination by the writer, so that nothing could be seen of it. The "stain...
Page 283 - Hunnewell cannel coal, Greenup county, Kentucky. Analysis by Dr. Peter and Mr. Talbutt. No. 3 Kanawha cannel coal, below falls of Kanawha Falls, West Virginia. Analysis by UR Johnson; copied from his work on coals. No. 4 the celebrated Wigan cannel coal, from Lancashire, England. Analysis by Heddle. CONCLUSIONS. A brief summary of the principal points of economical importance in the foregoing report may not be out of place here. Of the eight coals above the Conglomerate shown in the accompanying...
Page 275 - ... feet above Coal No. 3 we find a cannel coal. This is the cannel coal which is seen in the river hill about one mile below Wm. Spencer's. It is not well exposed here, but it seems to be •thin. It is probably also the cannel coal seen at GW John•son's, near the head of Nichols Fork of Frozen creek.

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