Human-Computer Interaction: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications

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Management Association, Information Resources
IGI Global, Oct 2, 2015 - Computers - 2208 pages
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As modern technologies continue to develop and evolve, the ability of users to interface with new systems becomes a paramount concern. Research into new ways for humans to make use of advanced computers and other such technologies is necessary to fully realize the potential of 21st century tools.

Human-Computer Interaction: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications gathers research on user interfaces for advanced technologies and how these interfaces can facilitate new developments in the fields of robotics, assistive technologies, and computational intelligence. This four-volume reference contains cutting-edge research for computer scientists; faculty and students of robotics, digital science, and networked communications; and clinicians invested in assistive technologies.

This seminal reference work includes chapters on topics pertaining to system usability, interactive design, mobile interfaces, virtual worlds, and more.

 

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Contents

Development and Design Methodologies
349
Tools and Technologies
665
Utilization and Application
1041
Organizational and Social Implications
1388
Managerial Impact
1735
Critical Issues
1860
Emerging Trends
2067
Index
xxx
Optional Back Ad
xl
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

Information Resources Management Association (IRMA) is a research-based professional organization dedicated to advancing the concepts and practices of information resources management in modern organizations. IRMA's primary purpose is to promote the understanding, development and practice of managing information resources as key enterprise assets among IRM/IT professionals. IRMA brings together researchers, practitioners, academicians, and policy makers in information technology management from over 50 countries. [Editor]

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