Armenian Golgotha: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1918

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Vintage Books, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 509 pages
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On April 24, 1915, Grigoris Balakian was arrested along with some 250 other leaders of Constantinople’s Armenian community. It was the beginning of the Ottoman Empire’s systematic attempt to eliminate the Armenian people from Turkey—a campaign that continued through World War I and the fall of the empire. Over the next four years, Balakian would bear witness to a seemingly endless caravan of blood, surviving to recount his miraculous escape and expose the atrocities that led to over a million deaths.
 
Armenian Golgothais Balakian’s devastating eyewitness account—a haunting reminder of the first modern genocide and a controversial historical document that is destined to become a classic of survivor literature.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - HenryKrinkle - LibraryThing

Sometimes gripping firsthand account of the Armenian genocide. The saintliness ascribes to the Armenian people (with the exception of a handful of traitors in Istanbul) is excessive, but Balakian's account of the forced death marches, and his escape is harrowing. Read full review

ARMENIAN GOLGOTHA: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1918

User Review  - Kirkus

The first English translation of a seminal personal account of the first modern genocide.Balakian (1873-1934) was a prominent intellectual and priest of the Armenian Church in Turkey at the outbreak ... Read full review

Contents

Armenia 500 B C Present
x
The 1915 Armenian Genocide in the Turkish Empire
xxx
Translators Note
xliii
In Berlin Before the
5
The General Condition of the Armenians at
31
The Secret Messenger
49
29
56
The Caravan
137
I
297
Escape from Amanos to Taurus
303
The Deportation of Patriarch Zaven Der Yeghiayan from
326
Meeting Armenian Intellectuals on the Road to Belemedik 3 35
335
The General Condition of the War at
347
The Disguised Vine Grower
357
Disappearance
368
The Turkish Army Invades the Caucasus and the Victory
374

Encountering Another Caravan of the Condemned
150
The Halys River Bridge
162
Kayseri to Tomarza
171
Tomarza to Gazbel
179
Sis to Garzbazar
205
Hasanbeyli to Islahiye The Sweet Smell of Bread
231
A Field of Mounds for Graves
240
Bad News from Der
247
Escape on the Way to AyranBaghche Vineyard 2
263
I
271
The HospitalSlaughterhouse of Turkish Soldiers
380
Escape from the Land of Blood
398
The Allied Fleet Victoriously Enters
411
The General Condition of Constantinople on
421
Acknowledgments
435
Authors Preface
453
Bibliography
469
Index
483
31
504
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Born in 1876, Grigoris Balakian was one of the leading Armenian intellectuals of his generation. In Ottoman Turkey he attended Armenian schools and seminary; and in Germany he studied, at different times, engineering and theology. He was one of the 250 cultural leaders (intellectuals, clergy, teachers, and political and community leaders) arrested by the Turkish government on the night of April 24, 1915, and deported to the interior. Unlike the vast majority of his conationals, he survived nearly four years in the killing fields. Ordained as a celibate priest (vartabed) in 1901, he later became a bishop and prelate of the Armenian Apostolic Church in southern France. He is the author of various books and monographs (some of them lost) on Armenian culture and history, including The Ruins of Ani (1910) and Armenian Golgotha, volume 1 (1922) and volume 2 (1959). He died in Marseilles in 1934.

Peter Balakian is the author of The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America’ s Response, winner of the 2005 Raphael Lemkin Prize, a New York Times best seller, and a New York Times Notable Book; and of Black Dog of Fate, winner of the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for the Art of Memoir, also a New York Times Notable Book. Grigoris Balakian was his great-uncle.

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