Modern Alchemy: Selected Papers of Glenn T. Seaborg

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World Scientific, 1994 - Science - 696 pages
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During his distinguished career spanning more than 50 years, Nobel laureate (Chemistry) Glenn T Seaborg published over 500 works. This volume puts together about 100 of his selected papers. The papers are divided into five categories. Category I consists of papers which detail the discovery of 10 transuranium elements and numerous heavy isotopes of special importance. Category II papers describe the discovery of a number of isotopes which became the workhorses of nuclear medicine or found other applications. Papers in Category III describe how the chemical properties of transuranium elements were originally determined, how chemistry is applied in nuclear sciences, and other chemical investigations, including early work done with the great chemist G N Lewis. Papers in Category IV cover radioactive decay chains and nuclear systematics. Lastly, papers in Category V illustrate how the powerful methods of chemistry are used to explain nuclear reactions in low, intermediate and high energy nuclear physics.
 

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Contents

Editors Comments on Papers 1 through 34
3
Radioactive Element 94 from Deuterons on Uranium
12
Heavy Isotopes by Bombardment of Pu
18
Nuclear Properties of 93 119
20
The New Element Americium Atomic Number 95
24
Production of Heavy Actinides from Interactions of O
28
The New Element Curium Atomic Number 96
53
Preparation of Transplutonium Isotopes by Neutron Irradiation
71
Chemistry of the Transactinide Elements
314
Chemical Separation of Nuclear Isomers
342
Artificial Radioactivity as a Test for Minute Traces of Elements
356
The First Use of Bismuth Phosphate for Separating Plutonium
363
The First Nuclear Reactor the Production of Plutonium
372
Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Organometallic
382
Primary and Secondary Acids and Bases
393
Trinitrotriphenylmethide Ion as a Secondary and Primary Base
402

Element 98
83
Element 97
86
New Elements Einsteinium and Fermium Atomic Numbers
91
Target Residues from the Reaction of 8 GeV Ne with Ta
100
New Element Mendelevium Atomic Number 101
101
Element No 102
103
Criteria for the Discovery of Chemical Elements
110
Ne and Ne with 24Cm
121
Excitation Functions for Production of Heavy Actinides from
128
Actinide Production in Reactions of Heavy Ions with Cn
135
Electronic Structure of the Heaviest Elements
145
The Periodic Table Tortuous Path to ManMade Elements
179
Early Radioactive Isotopes
187
Radioactive Isotopes of Manganese Iron and Cobalt
197
Nuclear Isomerism in Element 43
203
Applications to Chemistry
211
Early Work with Radioisotopes
217
The Radioisotopes Program in the Decade 19611971
224
G T Seaborg
238
Americium241
248
Editors Comments on Papers 48 through 71
253
The New Element Berkelium Atomic Number 97 74
278
Place in Periodic System and Electronic Structure of
279
The Chemical Properties of Elements 94 and 93
280
The Separation of Americium and Curium from the Rare Earth
287
Chemical Properties of Californium
293
AtomataTime Radiochemical Separations of the Heaviest
304
The Acidity of Aromatic Nitro Compounds toward Amines
409
The Research Style of Gilbert N Lewis Acids and Bases
415
Editors Comments on Papers 72 through 84
425
Further Work on Heavy Collateral Radioactive Chains
431
Evidence for Subshell at N 152
438
Slow Neutron and SpontaneousFission Properties of Heavy
441
HalfLife for Double BetaDecay
457
New Isotope Bk
464
Spontaneous Fission of U2 Pu Cm and Cm 440
470
Chemical and Radiochemical Probes
471
Uranium Target Fragmentation by Intermediate and High
476
Nuclear Transformations in the New High Energy Ranges
478
HighEnergy Proton SpallationFission of Uranium
484
Fission of Medium Weight Elements
516
SpallationFission Competition in Heaviest Elements
525
SpallationFission Competition in Astatine Compound Nuclei
550
MassYield Distributions in the Reaction of Kr Ions with U
556
Mass Distributions in the Reaction of 240 MeV C with Au
564
Search for Superheavy Elements in the Bombardment of Cn
576
Attempts to Produce Superheavy Elements by Fusion of Ca
588
Total Projectile Kinetic Energy Scaling in Energetic
631
Heavy Residue Spectra in the Interaction of 85A MeV C
638
Changes in Target Fragmentation Mechanisms with Increasing
656
Fragmentation of Au by 21 MeVnucleon Xe
671
Appendix
679
Author Index
695
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About the author (1994)

Born in Ishepeming, Michigan, Glenn Seaborg received a degree in chemistry from the University of California at Los Angeles. He then studied at the University of California at Berkeley, where he received a Ph.D. and taught until World War II. During the war Seaborg worked at the University of Chicago on the Manhattan Project. He was a leader of the team that discovered the transuranic elements plutonium, americium, and curium. This work led to the development of a method of separating plutonium from uranium in quantities large enough to make an atomic bomb. After World War II Seaborg continued his research on the creation of the transuranium elements. In 1951 he shared the Nobel Prize for discoveries in the chemistry of these elements with Edwin McMillan. Seaborg is codiscoverer of the elements Berkelium, Californium, Einsteinium, Fermium, Mendelevium, and Nobelium. He has spent most of his postwar professional life at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory. From 1961 to 1971 he also served as chairman of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

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