Stress: The Nature and History of Engineered Grief

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1992 - Health & Fitness - 203 pages
0 Reviews

Stress names a kind of grief unique to the modern period, a grief perpetually unresolved, evoked by the rapid and relentless changes characteristic of modernity. Because our grief is always unresolved, the passion of mourning is perpetually productive. Stress is also a discourse, a mutation of experience by the external power of speech, a power that can devour what it articulates.

Yet, it was not until World War II, when the psychiatric difficulties of pilots and bombers in particular brought stress into the open, that stress became a topic of medical and psychological research and a named cause of disorders. The term borrows the notions of pressure and tension from the engineering world. The seeds of stress are found around 1750, when the notion of luxury changed in meaning from a vice to be avoided to a virtue to be vigorously pursued. Before this time, human existence differed from ours in such a way that we detect no stress or anything like it. The book includes a phenomenology of the experience of stress, a history of the construction of engineered grief, and an assessment of stress management programs. Because such programs seek to make us comfortable with stress, they do not move us to bring the work of grieving to a resolution. This book will be of interest to post-modernists, phenomenologists, social constructionists, hermeneuticists, deconstructionists, social historians, and medical historians.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
7
The Ordering of Scarcity
8
II
9
The I of Stress
11
The Absence of Passion
12
III
14
Conclusion
17
IV
18
XVI
83
XVII
86
XVIII
88
XIX
91
Victory for Psychodynamics
95
XX
96
The Professions and Their Agendas
98
XXI
101

The Engineering of Grief
21
A Rhetoric of Energy and Boundaries
23
A Rhetoric of Control
27
V
29
VI
31
A Rhetoric of Loss
33
VII
39
VIII
44
Notes
46
IX
47
The Martial Beginnings of Stress
51
The War of the Worlds
52
Testing Training and Morales
57
Living in an Alien Environment
58
X
60
XI
61
The Stress on Systems
62
XII
63
A Brief Archeology of the Individual Under Stress
64
XIII
68
XIV
70
Notes
73
XV
79
XXII
104
XXIII
106
XXIV
109
XXV
117
The Social Construction of Overstrain of the Heart 18401870
122
XXVI
125
XXVII
127
XXVIII
128
XXIX
132
XXX
135
XXXI
140
XXXII
149
XXXIII
150
MedicalMoral Discourse of the EighteenthCentury
153
XXXIV
154
Conclusion
159
XXXV
161
The Two Ends of Engineered Grief
163
XXXVI
165
XXXVII
169
XXXVIII
191
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1992)

Robert Kugelmann is a professor of psychology at the University of Dallas. He has written two previous books: The Windows of Soul (1983) and Stress: The Nature and History of Engineered Grief (1992).

Bibliographic information