Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine, Volume 5

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Douglas William Jerrold
Punch Office, 1847
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Contains Douglas Jerrold's novel St. Giles and St. James (selected issues, no. 1-29), illustrated by Leech.
 

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Page 224 - A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver.
Page 333 - Seest thou a man wise in his own conceit? there is more hope of a fool than of him.
Page 222 - There is that speaketh like the piercings of a sword : but the tongue of the wise is health.
Page 96 - Swift as a shadow, short as any dream ; Brief as the lightning in the collied night, That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth. And ere a man hath power to say, — Behold ! The jaws of darkness do devour it up : So quick bright things come to confusion.
Page 93 - This happy breed of men, this little world, This precious stone set in the silver sea, Which serves it in the office of a wall Or as a moat defensive to a house, Against the envy of less happier lands, This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England, This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings, Fear'd by their breed and famous by their birth...
Page 305 - The invention all admired, and each how he To be the inventor missed; so easy it seemed, Once found, which yet unfound most would have thought Impossible!
Page 505 - Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new : That which they have done but earnest of the things that they shall do...
Page 233 - A generous friendship no cold medium knows, Burns with one love, with one resentment glows ; One should our interests and our passions be ; My friend must hate the man that injures me.
Page 89 - JEBB.-A LITERAL TRANSLATION OF THE BOOK OF PSALMS; intended to illustrate their Poetical and Moral Structure. To which are added. Dissertations on the word "Selah.
Page 300 - E'en wondered at because he dropt no sooner ; Fate seemed to wind him up for fourscore years ; Yet freshly ran he on ten winters more, Till, like a clock worn out with eating Time, The wheels of weary life at last stood still...

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