In the Anglo-Arab Labyrinth: The McMahon-Husayn Correspondence and Its Interpretations 1914-1939

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 19, 1976 - Political Science - 330 pages
The McMahon-Husayn correspondence greatly affected Anglo-Arab relations after the First World War. Written in obscure and ambiguous terms, it aroused great controversy, particularly over the issue of Palestine. Originally published in 1976, this study brought together for the first time all the available evidence from British, French and Arabic sources and elucidated the meaning of the correspondence. The controversy led to many enquiries within the Foreign Office as to the exact meaning and significance of the documents. Even before Palestine became a pressing issue, the formulation of British policy in the Middle East during the war and at the post-war settlement had occasioned other investigations. In the first part of this book Professor Kedourie examines the correspondence in its historical context to determine why its terms were so obscure and what lay in the minds of those who drafted it. The second part is an historiographical enquiry which reviews the widely differing interpretations of the correspondence which were produced in various departments of the Foreign Office from 1916 to 1939, when the correspondence was made public.
 

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Contents

THE FLY IN THE FLYBOTTLE
139
Sykes Picot and Husayn
159
Wingate Hogarth and Husayn
185
The Arab Bureau
203
Faysal
221
The Colonial Office
244
Knowledge Power and Guilt
309
Works Cited
321
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