Papers Relative to the Discussion with France in 1802 and 1803

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A. Strahan, 1803 - France - 431 pages
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Page 393 - Majesty, and bring away their effects, as well as their persons, without being restrained in their emigration, under any pretence whatsoever, except that of debts, or of criminal prosecutions: the term limited for this emigration shall be fixed to the space of eighteen months, to be computed from the day of the exchange of the ratifications of the present treaty.
Page 412 - ... as to prejudice the condition on which the other party has entered into the contract, the change...
Page 402 - With respect to the inhabitants of the countries restored or ceded, it is agreed, that none of them shall be prosecuted, disturbed, or molested, in their persons or properties, under any pretext, on account of their conduct or political opinions, or of their attachment to any of the contracting powers, nor on any other account, except that of debts contracted to individuals, or on account of acts posterior to the present treaty.
Page 64 - Luneville, conjointly with the other powers who were parties to that engagement. His Majesty has no other desire than that the people of Switzerland, who now appear to be so generally united, should be left at liberty to settle their own internal government without the interposition of any foreign powers ; and with whatever regret his...
Page 107 - He maintained that what ought to convince us of his desire of peace was, on the one hand, the little he had to gain by renewing the war, and, on the other, the facility with which he might have taken possession of Egypt, with the very ships and troops which were now going from the Mediterranean to St. Domingo, and that with the approbation of all Europe, and more particularly of the Turks, who had repeatedly invited him to join with them, for the purpose of forcing us to evacuate their territory.
Page 197 - I asked him whether he thought that such a cooduct would add to the glory of the first consul, or whether the falling on the innocent and defenceless would not rather tarnish it, -and ultimately unite against him, not only the honest men in his own country, but every government in Europe. — That it certainly would excite more detestation than terror in England, at the same time that it would serve to impress upon us still more strongly the necessity of omitting no means of circumscribing a power...
Page 133 - I told him that I had received letters from your lordship two days ago. He immediately said,' And so you are determined to go to war.' ' No !' I replied, 'we are too sensible of the advantages of peace.
Page 239 - Solicitude for the Prefervation of the Peace which fubfifts between the Two Countries ; His Difpofition to do every Thing in His Power for that Purpofe which is confiftent with the Honour of His Crown and the Interefts of His Dominions; and His Regret at any Circumftances which may have arifen to interrupt that Harmony and good Underftanding which are fo important to the Welfare and Happinefs of both Countries. You will, however, ftate moft...
Page 114 - Berlin with respect to the invitation that has been made to it, in consequence of the treaty, to become a guaranteeing Power; the abolition of the Spanish Priories in defiance of the treaty to which the King of Spain was a party; the declaration of the Portuguese Government of their intention to sequestrate the property of the Portuguese Priory, as forming a part of the Spanish Langue, unless the property of the Spanish Priories...
Page 107 - He said, that he had not chastised the Algerines from his unwillingness to excite the jealousy of other powers, but he hoped that England, Russia, and France, would one day feel that it was their interest to destroy such a nest of thieves, and force them to live rather by cultivating their land than by plunder.

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