Mind Ascribed: An Elaboration and Defence of Interpretivism

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John Benjamins Publishing, 2010 - Philosophy - 293 pages
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This book provides a thoroughly worked out and systematic presentation of an interpretivist position in the philosophy of mind, of the view that having mental properties is a matter of interpretation. Bruno Molder elaborates and defends a particular version of interpretivism, the ascription theory, which explicates the possession of mental states with contents in terms of their canonical ascribability, and shows how it can withstand various philosophical challenges. Apart from a defence of the ascription theory from the objections commonly directed against interpretivism, the book provides a critical analysis of major alternative accounts of mental state possession as well as the interpretivist ideas originating from Donald Davidson and Daniel Dennett. The viability of the approach is demonstrated by showing how one can treat mental causation as well as the faculties closely connected with consciousness perception and the awareness of one s own mental states in the interpretivist framework. (Series A)"
 

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Contents

1 Preliminaries
1
Part I Towards interpretivism
17
2 How not to have a mind
19
3 Interpretivism
75
Part II Elaborating and defending the ascription theory
129
4 Folk psychology and mental terms
131
5 The ascription theory
151
6 Objections and defence
185
7 Interpretivism and mental causation
207
8 Perception
233
9 Selfknowledge
257
10 Conclusion
275
References
279
Index
291
The series Advances in Consciousness Research
294
Copyright

Part III Extending the view
205

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