The Pictorial Key to the Tarot

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., May 1, 2007 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 244 pages
6 Reviews
"American-born British author and master of esoterica ARTHUR EDWARD WAITE (1857 1942) was cocreator of the famous 1910 Rider-Waite Tarot deck, and in 1911, he published what is still an essential guide to unleashing the prognosticatory power of the cards. Discover the history of the tarot, the secret traditions that inform it, and most vitally detailed explanations of each of the cards in the tarot deck and what they signify, including: the High Priestess (and what the scroll in her hand represents) the Lovers (and what mythological couple they evoke) the Wheel of Fortune (and what dangers it implies) the Hanged Man (and the significance of the tree of sacrifice) and all the rest of the cards. Complete with all the illustrations from the original 1911 edition, this information and entertaining work will delight anyone interested in the tarot, in mythological symbology, and everything arcane."
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
3
3 stars
1
2 stars
1
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jarvenpa - LibraryThing

Good, basic, very early tarot learning based on the Rider/Waite deck, which is kind of the King James Version of Tarot (learn it, and you know the basics and can go on to other stuff). This also ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Tullius22 - LibraryThing

It should be noted that Waite considers the actual divinatory uses of his subject with some aversion. He prefers the 'higher' realms of thought and he seems to fancy-flowery rosy-intellectual ... Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
6
IV
16
V
17
VI
29
VII
36
VIII
80
IX
81
XI
196
XII
199
XIII
203
XIV
205
XV
206
XVI
210
XVII
214
XVIII
216

X
84

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 6 - The Magus, Magician, or Juggler, the caster of the dice and mountebank in the world of vulgar trickery. This is the colportage interpretation, and it has the same correspondence with the real symbolical meaning that the use of the Tarot in fortune-telling has with its mystic construction according to the secret science of symbolism...
Page 2 - The true Tarot is symbolism; it speaks no other language and offers no other signs.
Page 2 - Mysteries, in a manner which is not arbitrary and has not been read in. But the wrong symbolical stories have been told concerning it, and the wrong history has been given in every published work which so far has dealt with the subject. "It has been intimated by two or three writers that, at least in respect of the meanings, this is unavoidably the case, because few are acquainted with them, while these few hold by transmission under pledges and cannot betray their trust. "The suggestion is fantastic...

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2007)

Arthur Edward Waite was born on October 2, 1857 in Brooklyn, New York. He was a poet and scholarly mystic who wrote extensively on occult and esoteric matters, and was the co-creator of the Rider-Waite Tarot deck. Waite joined the Outer Order of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn in January 1891 after being introduced by E.W. Berridge. In 1899 he entered the Second order of the Golden Dawn. He became a Freemason in 1901, and entered the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia in 1902. In 1903 Waite founded the Independent and Rectified Order R. R. et A. C. Waite was a prolific author and many of his works were well received in academic circles. He wrote occult texts on subjects including divination, esotericism, Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry, and ceremonial magic, Kabbalism and alchemy; he also translated and reissued several important mystical and alchemical works. His works on the Holy Grail, influenced by his friendship with Arthur Machen, were particularly notable. A number of his volumes remain in print, including The Book of Ceremonial Magic (1911), The Holy Kabbalah (1929), A New Encyclopedia of Freemasonry (1921), and his edited translation of Eliphas Levi's 1896 Transcendental Magic, its Doctrine and Ritual (1910), having seen reprints in recent years. Waite also wrote two allegorical fantasy novels, Prince Starbeam (1889) and The Quest of the Golden Stairs (1893).

Bibliographic information