Episodes of insect life. By Acheta Domestica

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Page 151 - And now in age I bud again, After so many deaths I live and write; I once more smell the dew and rain, And relish versing: O my only light, It cannot be That I am he, On whom thy tempests fell all night.
Page 351 - For every kind of beasts, and of birds, and of serpents, and of things in the sea, is tamed, and hath been tamed of mankind: but the tongue can no man tame; it is an unruly evil, full of deadly poison.
Page 22 - A fire devoureth before them, and behind them a flame burneth: the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness; yea, and nothing shall escape them.
Page 448 - Trans., with Notes, by T. Ross. 3 vols. Views of Nature ; or, Contemplations of the Sublime Phenomena of Creation, with Scientific Illustrations. Trans, by EC Otte.
Page 3 - Tis filled wherever thou dost tread, Nature's self's thy Ganymede. Thou dost drink, and dance, and sing, Happier than the happiest king. All the fields which thou dost see, All the plants, belong to thee ; All that summer hours produce, Fertile made with early juice; Man for thee does sow and plow; Farmer he, and landlord thou...
Page 9 - To thee of all things upon earth, Life is no longer than thy mirth. Happy insect! happy thou, Dost neither age nor winter know! But when thou'st drunk, and danced, and sung Thy fill, the flowery leaves among, (Voluptuous and wise withal, Epicurean animal!) Sated with thy summer feast, Thou retir'st to endless rest.
Page 151 - These are thy wonders, Lord of love, To make us see we are but flowers that glide : Which when we once can find and prove, Thou hast a garden for us, where to bide. Who would be more, Swelling through store, Forfeit their Paradise by their pride.
Page 199 - Direct it flies and rapid, Shattering that it may reach, and shattering what it reaches. My son ! the road, the human being travels, That, on which BLESSING comes and goes, doth follow The river's course, the valley's playful windings, Curves round the corn-field and the hill of vines, Honouring the holy bounds of property ! And thus secure, though late, leads to its end.
Page 9 - Thou best of men and friends! We will create A genuine summer in each other's breast; And spite of this cold time and frozen fate Thaw us a warm seat to our rest. Our sacred...
Page 445 - REEVE -CONCHOLOGIA SYSTEMATICA : Or, Complete System of Conchology: in which the Lepades and Mollusca are described and classified according to their Natural Organization and Habits ; illustrated with 300 highly finished copper-plate engravings, by Messrs.

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