Intertextual War: Edmund Burke and the French Revolution in the Writings of Mary Wollstonecraft, Thomas Paine, and James Mackintosh

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Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 1997 - History - 256 pages
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Intertextual War focuses on representations of Edmund Burke and Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) by Burke's principal eighteenth-century respondents. Concentrating on the respondents' relevant works, the author reconstructs the intertextual war they were waging against Burke and the traditional eighteenth-century canon, illustrating how a variety of eighteenth-century texts and contexts ground their rebellious reading of the both Burke and the Revolution as they deconstruct the former and rewrite the latter.
 

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Contents

Hie mulier Haec vir Wollstonecrafts Feminization of Burke in The Rights of Men
26
Intertextual War Wollstonecraft and the Language of Burkes Enquiry
40
Reflected Resemblances Wollstonecrafts Representation of Burke in The Rights of Men
62
Paine and the Myth of Burkes Secret Pension
84
Paines Revolutionary Comedy The Bastille and October Days in the Rights of Man
96
Revolution and the Canon Paines Critique of the Old Linguistic Order and the Creation of the Revolutionary Writer
108
Mackintosh Burke and the French Revolution
124
Mackintosh Burke and the Glorious Revolution
136
Revolution in Property
160
Revolution in Representation Electoral and Economic Paradigms in Vindiciae Gallicae
178
Conclusion
209
Paines Letter to Burke
215
Notes
217
Works Cited
243
Index
252
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Page 29 - This is a way of proceeding quite contrary to metaphor and allusion, wherein for the most part lies that entertainment and pleasantry of wit which strikes so lively on the fancy, and therefore...
Page 34 - All the decent drapery of life is to be rudely torn off. All the superadded ideas, furnished from the wardrobe of a moral imagination, which the heart owns and the understanding ratifies as necessary to cover the defects of our naked, shivering nature and to raise it to dignity in our own estimation, are to be exploded as a ridiculous, absurd, and antiquated fashion.

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