History of England from the death of 'Edward the confessor' to the death of John

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Page 121 - They greatly oppressed the wretched people by making them work at these castles, and when the castles were finished they filled them with devils and evil men. Then they took those whom they suspected to have any goods, by night and by day, seizing both men and women, and they put them in prison for their gold and silver, and tortured them with pains unspeakable, for never were any martyrs tormented as these were.
Page 227 - And a villein shall be amerced after the same manner, saving to him his wainage, if he falls under our mercy ; and none of the aforesaid amerciaments shall be assessed but by the oath of honest men in the neighbourhood.
Page 226 - And the City of London shall have all its ancient liberties and free customs, as well by land as by water : furthermore we will and grant, that all other cities and boroughs, and towns and ports, shall have all their liberties and free customs.
Page 138 - The wild exploits of those romantic knights who sallied forth in quest of adventures, are well known, and have been treated with proper ridicule. The political and permanent effects of the spirit of chivalry have been less observed.
Page 121 - Many thousands they exhausted with hunger. I cannot and I may not tell of all the wounds, and all the tortures that they inflicted upon the wretched men of this land; and this state of things lasted the nineteen years that Stephen was king, and ever grew worse and worse.
Page 121 - Then was corn dear, and flesh, and cheese, and butter, for there was none in the land. Wretched men starved with hunger. Some lived on alms, who had been erewhile rich. Some fled the country. Never was there more misery, and never acted heathens worse than these.
Page 227 - It shall be lawful, for the time to come, for any one to go out of our kingdom, and return safely and securely, by land or by water, saving his allegiance to us...
Page 226 - No FREEMAN SHALL BE TAKEN OR IMPRISONED, OR DISSEISED, OR OUTLAWED, OR BANISHED, OR ANY WAYS DESTROYED, NOR WILL WE PASS UPON HIM, NOR WILL WE SEND UPON HIM, UNLESS BY THE LAWFUL JUDGMENT OF HIS PEERS, OR BY THE LAW OF THE LAND.
Page 226 - No FREEMAN SHALL BE TAKEN OR IMPRISONED, OR BE DISSEISED OF HIS FREEHOLD, OR LIBERTIES, OR FREE CUSTOMS, OR BE OUTLAWED, OR EXILED, OR ANY OTHERWISE DESTROYED ; NOR WILL WE PASS UPON HIM, NOR SEND UPON HIM, BUT BY LAWFUL JUDGMENT OF HIS PEERS, OR BY THE LAW OF THE LAND. WE WILL SELL TO NO MAN, WE WILL NOT DENY OR DELAY TO ANY MAN, JUSTICE OR RIGHT.* " It is obvious,
Page 5 - Philips' Series of Large School-room Maps. With the Physical Features boldly and distinctly delineated, and the Political Boundaries carefully colored. Size— 5 feet 8 inches by 4 feet 6 inches. Mounted on rollers and varnished. Constructed by William Hughes, FRGS LIST OF Till!

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