The Future Eaters: An Ecological History of the Australasian Lands and People

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Grove Press, 2002 - History - 423 pages
2 Reviews
Humans first settled the islands of Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, and New Guinea some sixty millennia ago, and as they had elsewhere across the globe, immediately began altering the environment by hunting and trapping animals and gathering fruits and vegetables. In this illustrated iconoclastic ecological history, acclaimed scientist and historian Tim Flannery follows the environment of the islands through the age of dinosaurs to the age of mammals and the arrival of humanity on its shores, to the coming of European colonizers and the advent of the industrial society that would change nature's balance forever. Penetrating, gripping, and provocative, The Future Eaters is a dramatic narrative history that combines natural history, anthropology, and ecology on an epic scale. "Flannery tells his beautiful story in plain language, science-popularizing at its Antipodean best." -- Times Literary Supplement "Like the present-day incarnation of some early-nineteenth-century explorer-scholar, Tim Flannery refuses to be fenced in." -- Time
 

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User Review  - nandadevi - LibraryThing

Flannery has a point (or several) to make and he makes and remakes them time and again to the point of (almost) screaming frustration or dull submission. What saves this book is the countless dips ... Read full review

The future eaters: an ecological history of the Australasian lands and people

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

During the ice ages, when the sea level was low, Australia, New Guinea, Tasmania, and smaller islands reemerged as a single landmass known as Meganesia, connected to Antarctica. Harsh conditions ... Read full review

Contents

The New Lands
20
Australia in Gondwana
30
Land of Geckos Land of Flowers
42
Land of Sound and Fury
52
Meganesian Enterprises
67
Splendid Isolation
75
Sweet are the Uses of Adversity
85
The Diversity Enigma
92
Time Dwarfs
208
Sons of Prometheus
217
Who Killed Kirlilpi?
237
When Thou Hast Enough Remember the Time of Hunger
242
Alone on the Southern Isles Weirds Broke Them
260
So Varied in DetailSo Similar in Outline
271
A Few Fertile Valleys
292
The Last Wave Arrival of the Europeans
299

The Desert Sea
102
The Mystery of the Meganesian Meateaters
108
A Bestiary of Gentle Giants
117
Lost Marsupial Giants of New Guinea
130
Arrival of the Future Eaters
135
What a Piece of work is a Man
136
Gloriously Deceitful and a Virgin
144
Peopling the Lost islands of Tasmantis
164
The Great Megafauna Extinction Debate
180
Making the Savage Beast
187
There Aint No More Moa In Old Aotearoa
195
Lost in the Mists of Time
199
The Backwater Country
300
As If We Had Been Old Friends
312
Diverse Experiences
323
Like Plantations in a Gentlemans Park
344
Unbounded Optimism
357
Riding the Red SteerFire and Biodiversity Conservation in Australia
376
Adapting Culture to Biological Reality
389
Postscript
407
Maps and list of photographs
408
Selected Reference
412
Index
418
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Page 19 - Revolutions still more remote appeared in the distance of this extraordinary perspective. The mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time...

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About the author (2002)

TIM FLANNERY has written many award-winning books, including The Weather Makers, which reached #1 in Canada, An Explorer's Notebook, Now or Never and Here on Earth. He is the National Geographic Society's Australasian representative and a director of the Australian Wildlife Conservancy. In January 2007, he was named Australian of the Year and in 2011, he became Australia's first climate commissioner. Visit him online at theweathermakers.org.

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