Paul Grice: Philosopher and Linguist

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Springer, Feb 9, 2005 - Philosophy - 247 pages
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Paul Grice (1913-1988) is best known for his psychological account of meaning, and for his theory of conversational implicature, although these form only part of a large and diverse body of work. This is the first book to consider Grice's work as a whole. Drawing on the range of his published writing, and also on unpublished manuscripts, lectures and notes, Siobhan Chapman discusses the development of Grice's ideas and relates his work to the major events of his intellectual and professional life.
 

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Contents

1 The Skilful Heretic
1
2 Philosophical Influences
10
3 PostWar Oxford
31
4 Meaning
61
5 Logic and Conversation
85
6 American Formalism
114
7 Philosophical Psychology
138
8 Metaphysics and Value
157
9 Gricean Pragmatics
185
Notes
217
Bibliography
232
Index
243
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About the author (2005)

SIOBHAN CHAPMAN is Senior Lecturer in English language, University of Liverpool, UK. Her publications include Language and Empiricism - After the Vienna Circle (2008), Accent in Context (1998) and Philosophy for Linguists (2000).